In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 30, 2013, former National Intelligence Service director Won Sei-hoon, center, leaves Supreme Prosecutors' Office after being summoned, in Seoul, South Korea. The scandal shaking up South Korea’s main spy agency is not cloak-and-dagger stuff, but the kind of low-grade trickery anyone with an Internet connection could pull off. And the target was not Seoul’s opaque rival to the north, but the country’s own people. Internet postings ostensibly from ordinary South Koreas, but actually from National Intelligence Service agents, allegedly boosted President Park Geun-hye while she was running for the job as the ruling party’s nominee. She was reportedly dubbed “the best,” while her opponent, in a play on his name, was called “criminal.” (AP Photo/Yonhap, Im Hun-jung) KOREA OUT

Associated Press
In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 30, 2013, former National Intelligence Service director Won Sei-hoon, center, leaves Supreme Prosecutors' Office after being summoned, in Seoul, South Korea. The scandal shaking up South Korea’s main spy agency is not cloak-and-dagger stuff, but the kind of low-grade trickery anyone with an Internet connection could pull off. And the target was not Seoul’s opaque rival to the north, but the country’s own people. Internet postings ostensibly from ordinary South Koreas, but actually from National Intelligence Service agents, allegedly boosted President Park Geun-hye while she was running for the job as the ruling party’s nominee. She was reportedly dubbed “the best,” while her opponent, in a play on his name, was called “criminal.” (AP Photo/Yonhap, Im Hun-jung) KOREA OUT
In this photo taken on Tuesday, April 30, 2013, former National Intelligence Service director Won Sei-hoon, center, leaves Supreme Prosecutors' Office after being summoned, in Seoul, South Korea. The scandal shaking up South Korea’s main spy agency is not cloak-and-dagger stuff, but the kind of low-grade trickery anyone with an Internet connection could pull off. And the target was not Seoul’s opaque rival to the north, but the country’s own people. Internet postings ostensibly from ordinary South Koreas, but actually from National Intelligence Service agents, allegedly boosted President Park Geun-hye while she was running for the job as the ruling party’s nominee. She was reportedly dubbed “the best,” while her opponent, in a play on his name, was called “criminal.” (AP Photo/Yonhap, Im Hun-jung) KOREA OUT
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