In this photo taken Tuesday, March 6, 2012, Sheik Ayed al-Abed, right, and Edya, name given, attend a meeting in the southern Israeli city of Dimona. For years, Israel's array of African communities had little interaction, divided by religious, linguistic and cultural differences that made it impossible to think about one another. But in an unprecedented gathering, some members of these communities, including Jewish Ethiopians, nomadic Muslim Arabs and migrants from Eritrea and Sudan are banding together, claiming their shared skin tone has given them a common experience of discrimination. (AP Photo/Diaa Hadid)

Associated Press
In this photo taken Tuesday, March 6, 2012, Sheik Ayed al-Abed, right, and Edya, name given, attend a meeting in the southern Israeli city of Dimona. For years, Israel's array of African communities had little interaction, divided by religious, linguistic and cultural differences that made it impossible to think about one another. But in an unprecedented gathering, some members of these communities, including Jewish Ethiopians, nomadic Muslim Arabs and migrants from Eritrea and Sudan are banding together, claiming their shared skin tone has given them a common experience of discrimination. (AP Photo/Diaa Hadid)
In this photo taken Tuesday, March 6, 2012, Sheik Ayed al-Abed, right, and Edya, name given, attend a meeting in the southern Israeli city of Dimona. For years, Israel's array of African communities had little interaction, divided by religious, linguistic and cultural differences that made it impossible to think about one another. But in an unprecedented gathering, some members of these communities, including Jewish Ethiopians, nomadic Muslim Arabs and migrants from Eritrea and Sudan are banding together, claiming their shared skin tone has given them a common experience of discrimination. (AP Photo/Diaa Hadid)
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