In this photo taken on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, people walk past an advertising poster depicting an emperor seat with the words "Feel free come, have a seat" near the city government office in Xilinhot in northern China’s Inner Mongolia. Buying and selling office is so rampant in China that it has eroded public trust in officialdom, undermining the ruling Communist Party’s image as an institute that promotes the competent, not the connected. Even though Chinese leaders have vowed to eradicate the practice, it has showed no sign of abatement. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Associated Press
In this photo taken on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, people walk past an advertising poster depicting an emperor seat with the words "Feel free come, have a seat" near the city government office in Xilinhot in northern China’s Inner Mongolia. Buying and selling office is so rampant in China that it has eroded public trust in officialdom, undermining the ruling Communist Party’s image as an institute that promotes the competent, not the connected. Even though Chinese leaders have vowed to eradicate the practice, it has showed no sign of abatement. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
In this photo taken on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, people walk past an advertising poster depicting an emperor seat with the words "Feel free come, have a seat" near the city government office in Xilinhot in northern China’s Inner Mongolia. Buying and selling office is so rampant in China that it has eroded public trust in officialdom, undermining the ruling Communist Party’s image as an institute that promotes the competent, not the connected. Even though Chinese leaders have vowed to eradicate the practice, it has showed no sign of abatement. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
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