In this photo of Tuesday Oct. 30, 2012, Somali porters offload charcoal from a truck at a charcoal market in Mogadishu, Somalia. Thousands of sacks of dark charcoal sit atop one another in Somalia's southern port city of Kismayo, an industry once worth some $25 million dollar a year to the al-Qaida-linked insurgents who controlled the region. The good news sitting in the idle pile of sacks is that al-Shabab militants can no longer fund their insurgency through the illegal export of the charcoal. Kenyan troops late last month invaded Kismayo and forced out the insurgents, putting a halt to the export of charcoal, a trade the U.N. banned earlier this year in an effort to cut militant profits. The loss of the charcoal trade "will cut a major source of revenue and thus will have a detrimental effect on their operational capacity to carry out large scale attacks," Mohamed Sheikh Abdi, a Somali political analyst, said of al-Shabab. But the flip side to the charcoal problem is that residents who made their living from the trade no longer are making money, a potentially tricky issue for the Kenyan troops who now control the region. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

Associated Press
In this photo of Tuesday Oct. 30, 2012, Somali porters  offload charcoal from a truck  at a charcoal market in Mogadishu, Somalia. Thousands of sacks of dark charcoal sit atop one another in Somalia's southern port city of Kismayo, an industry once worth some $25 million dollar a year to the al-Qaida-linked insurgents who controlled the region.  The good news sitting in the idle pile of sacks is that al-Shabab militants can no longer fund their insurgency through the illegal export of the charcoal. Kenyan troops late last month invaded Kismayo and forced out the insurgents, putting a halt to the export of charcoal, a trade the U.N. banned earlier this year in an effort to cut militant profits. The loss of the charcoal trade "will cut a major source of revenue and thus will have a detrimental effect on their operational capacity to carry out large scale attacks," Mohamed Sheikh Abdi, a Somali political analyst, said of al-Shabab.  But the flip side to the charcoal problem is that residents who made their living from the trade no longer are making money, a potentially tricky issue for the Kenyan troops who now control the region. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)
In this photo of Tuesday Oct. 30, 2012, Somali porters offload charcoal from a truck at a charcoal market in Mogadishu, Somalia. Thousands of sacks of dark charcoal sit atop one another in Somalia's southern port city of Kismayo, an industry once worth some $25 million dollar a year to the al-Qaida-linked insurgents who controlled the region. The good news sitting in the idle pile of sacks is that al-Shabab militants can no longer fund their insurgency through the illegal export of the charcoal. Kenyan troops late last month invaded Kismayo and forced out the insurgents, putting a halt to the export of charcoal, a trade the U.N. banned earlier this year in an effort to cut militant profits. The loss of the charcoal trade "will cut a major source of revenue and thus will have a detrimental effect on their operational capacity to carry out large scale attacks," Mohamed Sheikh Abdi, a Somali political analyst, said of al-Shabab. But the flip side to the charcoal problem is that residents who made their living from the trade no longer are making money, a potentially tricky issue for the Kenyan troops who now control the region. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)
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