A handout picture made available by the Royal Observatory of Belgium on February 25, 2014 shows a European Space Agency (ESA) Sun-watching Proba-Two mini-satellite image of the aftermath of the ... more 
A handout picture made available by the Royal Observatory of Belgium on February 25, 2014 shows a European Space Agency (ESA) Sun-watching Proba-Two mini-satellite image of the aftermath of the 'coronal mass ejection', on space, February 18, 2014. The image, acquired a little more than three hours after the initial eruption, demonstrates the Sun?s magnetic field reconnecting in the form of loops, down and left of the center of the solar disc to clearly see this distinctive belt of loops. Coronal mass ejections are powered by energy stored in the magnetic field of the Sun?s corona. This energy that can be released by the process of reconnection, in which oppositely oriented field lines are reconfigured to a more relaxed state and stored magnetic energy is converted into the heat and kinetic energy needed to drive huge outward eruptions. Fields that have recently reconnected are heated to many millions of degrees, then cooling to the one million degree temperatures that are visible to Proba-Two?s Sun Watcher using Active Pixel System Detector and Image Processing (SWAP) imager. A second Proba-Two sensor, Lyman Alpha Radiometer (LYRA), measures the Sun?s energy intensity at the same time. Both instruments are operated for ESA by the ROB. (EPA/ESA) less 
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Yahoo News | Photo By EPA/ESA
Tue, Feb 25, 2014 11:00 AM EST