Sea foam is seen amongst dead mangrove, formerly dense, green and a nesting sight for brown pelicans, egrets and roaseate spoon bill, which was directly impacted by oil from the nation's worst offshore oil spill, is seen as it erodes into Barataria Bay at Cat Island in Plaquemines Parish, La., Thursday, April 18, 2013. Underneath the surface, environmentalists and scientists fear there may be trouble, from tiny organisms to dolphins. Yet the long-term environmental impact from the spill is still not fully known and will likely be debated for years to come. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Associated Press
Sea foam is seen amongst dead mangrove, formerly dense, green and a nesting sight for brown pelicans, egrets and roaseate spoon bill, which was directly impacted by oil from the nation's worst offshore oil spill, is seen as it erodes into Barataria Bay at Cat Island in Plaquemines Parish, La., Thursday, April 18, 2013. Underneath the surface, environmentalists and scientists fear there may be trouble, from tiny organisms to dolphins. Yet the long-term environmental impact from the spill is still not fully known and will likely be debated for years to come. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Sea foam is seen amongst dead mangrove, formerly dense, green and a nesting sight for brown pelicans, egrets and roaseate spoon bill, which was directly impacted by oil from the nation's worst offshore oil spill, is seen as it erodes into Barataria Bay at Cat Island in Plaquemines Parish, La., Thursday, April 18, 2013. Underneath the surface, environmentalists and scientists fear there may be trouble, from tiny organisms to dolphins. Yet the long-term environmental impact from the spill is still not fully known and will likely be debated for years to come. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
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