Seniors caring for seniors

Associated Press
In this Nov. 21, 2013 photo, caregiver Warren Manchess, left, laughs with Paul Gregoline and Paul's wife, Mary, as they work on a puzzle, in Noblesville Ind. Burgeoning demand for senior services like home health aides is being met by a surprising segment of the workforce: Other seniors. Twenty-nine percent of so-called direct-care workers are projected to be 55 or older by 2018 and in some segments of that population older workers are the single largest age demographic. With high rates of turnover, home care agencies have shown a willingness to hire older people new to the field who have found a tough job market as they try to supplement their retirement income.(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

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Paul Gregoline lies in bed, awaiting the helper who will get him up, bathed and groomed. He is 92 years old, has Alzheimer's disease and needs a hand with nearly every task the day brings. When the aide arrives, though, he doesn't look so different from the client himself — bald and bespectacled.

"Just a couple of old geezers," jokes Warren Manchess, the 74-year-old caregiver.

As demand for senior services provided by nurses' aides, home health aides and other such workers grows with the aging of baby boomers, so are those professions' employment of other seniors. The new face of America's network of caregivers is increasingly wrinkled. (AP)

(Photos by Darron Cummings/AP Photo)

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