In this Sept. 22, 2012 photo provided by the Chicago-based John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Dr. Elissa Hallem, 34, a neurobiologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who explores the physiology and behavioral consequences of odor detection in invertebrates and identifies interventions that may eventually reduce the scourge of parasitic infections in humans. is seen at her office in Los Angeles. Hallem is among 23 recipients of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius grants." (AP Photo/Courtesy of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Stephanie Diani)

Associated Press
In this Sept. 22, 2012 photo provided by the Chicago-based John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Dr. Elissa Hallem,  34, a neurobiologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who explores the physiology and behavioral consequences of odor detection in invertebrates and identifies interventions that may eventually reduce the scourge of parasitic infections in humans. is seen at her office in Los Angeles. Hallem is among 23 recipients of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius grants." (AP Photo/Courtesy of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Stephanie Diani)
In this Sept. 22, 2012 photo provided by the Chicago-based John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Dr. Elissa Hallem, 34, a neurobiologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who explores the physiology and behavioral consequences of odor detection in invertebrates and identifies interventions that may eventually reduce the scourge of parasitic infections in humans. is seen at her office in Los Angeles. Hallem is among 23 recipients of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius grants." (AP Photo/Courtesy of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Stephanie Diani)
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