In this Sept. 25, 2012 photo, a deflated soccer ball lays in a street in an area that used to be the town where miners lived at the Chuquicamata copper mine in Atacama desert in northern Chile. The town was moved as the mine grew. Experts say that by 2019 the Chuquicamata copper mine will be unprofitable, so state-owned mining company Codelco is trying to head off closure by converting the open pit into the world's largest underground mine. Codelco believes the mine still has much more to give, with reserves equal to about 60 percent of all the copper exploited in the mine's history still buried deep beneath the crater. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)

Associated Press
In this Sept. 25, 2012 photo, a deflated soccer ball lays in a street in an area that used to be the town where miners lived at the Chuquicamata copper mine in Atacama desert in northern Chile. The town was moved as the mine grew.  Experts say that by 2019 the Chuquicamata copper mine will be unprofitable, so state-owned mining company Codelco is trying to head off closure by converting the open pit into the world's largest underground mine. Codelco believes the mine still has much more to give, with reserves equal to about 60 percent of all the copper exploited in the mine's history still buried deep beneath the crater. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
In this Sept. 25, 2012 photo, a deflated soccer ball lays in a street in an area that used to be the town where miners lived at the Chuquicamata copper mine in Atacama desert in northern Chile. The town was moved as the mine grew. Experts say that by 2019 the Chuquicamata copper mine will be unprofitable, so state-owned mining company Codelco is trying to head off closure by converting the open pit into the world's largest underground mine. Codelco believes the mine still has much more to give, with reserves equal to about 60 percent of all the copper exploited in the mine's history still buried deep beneath the crater. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
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