In this Sept. 26, 2012 photo, astronomer Bill Dent, left, engineer Rodrigo 

In this Sept. 26, 2012 photo, astronomer Bill Dent, left, engineer Rodrigo Amestica, center, and array operator Patricio Alvarez work at the Operations Support Facility of one of the worlds largest astronomy projects, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. The lack of humidity, low interference from other radio signals and closeness to the upper atmosphere in this remote plateau high above Chile's Atacama desert, is the perfect spot for the ALMA, the earth's largest radio telescope, which is on track to be completed in March. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
Associated Press
In this Sept. 26, 2012 photo, astronomer Bill Dent, left, engineer Rodrigo Amestica, center, and array operator Patricio Alvarez work at the Operations Support Facility of one of the worlds largest astronomy projects, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. The lack of humidity, low interference from other radio signals and closeness to the upper atmosphere in this remote plateau high above Chile's Atacama desert, is the perfect spot for the ALMA, the earth's largest radio telescope, which is on track to be completed in March. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
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