In this Sept. 26, 2012 photo, painter Iver Osandor, from Chile, climbs 

In this Sept. 26, 2012 photo, painter Iver Osandor, from Chile, climbs a ladder as he works on an antenna at the European assembly site at one of the worlds largest astronomy projects, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Atacama desert in northern Chile.  Linked as a single giant telescope, the radio antennas pick up wavelengths of light longer than anything visible to the human eye and colder than infrared telescopes, which are good at capturing images of distant suns but miss planets and clouds of gases from which stars are formed.  (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
Associated Press
In this Sept. 26, 2012 photo, painter Iver Osandor, from Chile, climbs a ladder as he works on an antenna at the European assembly site at one of the worlds largest astronomy projects, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. Linked as a single giant telescope, the radio antennas pick up wavelengths of light longer than anything visible to the human eye and colder than infrared telescopes, which are good at capturing images of distant suns but miss planets and clouds of gases from which stars are formed. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
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