South Korean woman wears a mask of hero character with special glasses on, observes the transit of venus at National Science Museum in Gwacheon, south of Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. From the U.S. to South Korea, people turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. The next one won't be for another 105 years. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Associated Press
South Korean woman wears a mask of hero character with special glasses on, observes the transit of venus at National Science Museum in Gwacheon, south of Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. From the U.S. to South Korea, people turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. The next one won't be for another 105 years. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
South Korean woman wears a mask of hero character with special glasses on, observes the transit of venus at National Science Museum in Gwacheon, south of Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. From the U.S. to South Korea, people turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. The next one won't be for another 105 years. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
View Comments (4)