Staffan Normark, a member of the Swedish Academy of Sciences presents the 2012 Nobel Prize laureates in Physics, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. A French-American duo shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for inventing methods to observe the bizarre properties of the quantum world, research that has led to the construction of extremely precise clocks and helped scientists take the first steps toward building superfast computers. Serge Haroche of France and American David Wineland opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics by showing how to observe individual quantum particles without destroying them, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said. (AP Photo/Bertil Enevag Ericson /Scanpix) SWEDEN OUT

Associated Press
Staffan Normark, a member of the Swedish Academy of Sciences presents the 2012 Nobel Prize laureates in Physics, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. A French-American duo shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for inventing methods to observe the bizarre properties of the quantum world, research that has led to the construction of extremely precise clocks and helped scientists take the first steps toward building superfast computers. Serge Haroche of France and American David Wineland opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics by showing how to observe individual quantum particles without destroying them, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said. (AP Photo/Bertil Enevag Ericson /Scanpix)    SWEDEN OUT
Staffan Normark, a member of the Swedish Academy of Sciences presents the 2012 Nobel Prize laureates in Physics, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. A French-American duo shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for inventing methods to observe the bizarre properties of the quantum world, research that has led to the construction of extremely precise clocks and helped scientists take the first steps toward building superfast computers. Serge Haroche of France and American David Wineland opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics by showing how to observe individual quantum particles without destroying them, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said. (AP Photo/Bertil Enevag Ericson /Scanpix) SWEDEN OUT
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