In this Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013 photo, Egyptian archeologist Mohammed Younes, head 

In this Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013 photo, Egyptian archeologist Mohammed Younes, head of antiquities of Dahshour, talks to the Associated Press at his office in the ancient historic site of Dahshour, Egypt. The illegal expansion of a local cemetery has raised a panic among antiquities experts, who warn that the construction endangers Dahshour. An explosion of illegal building the past two years is endangering Egypt's ancient treasures around the country, antiquities authorities say. With no police enforcing regulations, locals living next to some of most beloved Pharaonic sites including the famed Giza Pyramids are grabbing land, building homes, laying farmland or selling off parcels, said Younes. The cemetery expansion is the most dangerous encroachment yet because of how close it comes to the Dahshour monuments, which are on the UNESCO World Heritage site list, he said. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
Associated Press
In this Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013 photo, Egyptian archeologist Mohammed Younes, head of antiquities of Dahshour, talks to the Associated Press at his office in the ancient historic site of Dahshour, Egypt. The illegal expansion of a local cemetery has raised a panic among antiquities experts, who warn that the construction endangers Dahshour. An explosion of illegal building the past two years is endangering Egypt's ancient treasures around the country, antiquities authorities say. With no police enforcing regulations, locals living next to some of most beloved Pharaonic sites including the famed Giza Pyramids are grabbing land, building homes, laying farmland or selling off parcels, said Younes. The cemetery expansion is the most dangerous encroachment yet because of how close it comes to the Dahshour monuments, which are on the UNESCO World Heritage site list, he said. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
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