In this Sunday, March 17, 2013 photo, a Christian woman stands in front of a church, in Assiut, southern Egypt. The Gamaa Islamiya once waged a bloody insurgency, attacking police and Christians in a campaign to create an Islamic state. Now a political force, the former jihadis say they are setting up their own parallel police and are determined to ensure law and order in this southern Egyptian province. “We will not accept, under any circumstances, that a group takes over the streets,” said Father Banoub, a trained civil engineer who is now the church's point cleric on relations with local authorities and Islamist groups. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

Associated Press
In this Sunday, March 17, 2013 photo, a Christian woman stands in front of a church, in Assiut, southern Egypt. The Gamaa Islamiya once waged a bloody insurgency, attacking police and Christians in a campaign to create an Islamic state. Now a political force, the former jihadis say they are setting up their own parallel police and are determined to ensure law and order in this southern Egyptian province. “We will not accept, under any circumstances, that a group takes over the streets,” said Father Banoub, a trained civil engineer who is now the church's point cleric on relations with local authorities and Islamist groups. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)
In this Sunday, March 17, 2013 photo, a Christian woman stands in front of a church, in Assiut, southern Egypt. The Gamaa Islamiya once waged a bloody insurgency, attacking police and Christians in a campaign to create an Islamic state. Now a political force, the former jihadis say they are setting up their own parallel police and are determined to ensure law and order in this southern Egyptian province. “We will not accept, under any circumstances, that a group takes over the streets,” said Father Banoub, a trained civil engineer who is now the church's point cleric on relations with local authorities and Islamist groups. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)
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