In this Thursday, April 12, 2012 photo, inmate Steve Wohlen displays heroin needle tracks in his arm during an Associated Press interview in a state prison, in Bridgewater, Mass. Wohlen was saved from... more 
In this Thursday, April 12, 2012 photo, inmate Steve Wohlen displays heroin needle tracks in his arm during an Associated Press interview in a state prison, in Bridgewater, Mass. Wohlen was saved from a life-threatening heroin overdose in 2010 by his mother when she applied two quick sprays of Narcan, a drug that blocks opioid receptors in the brain to reverse overdoses of opiates. The drug, widely sold under its generic name, naloxone, counteracts the effects of heroin, OxyContin and other powerful painkillers and has been routinely used by ambulance crews and emergency rooms in the U.S. and other countries for decades. But in the past few years, public health officials across the nation have been distributing it free to addicts and their loved ones, as well as to some police and firefighters. Wohlen is serving a 5- to 7-year sentence for an armed robbery he committed to support his heroin habit. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) less 
1 / 2
Associated Press | Photo By Steven Senne
Thu, Apr 26, 2012 2:08 PM EDT