In this Thursday, April 4, 2013 provided by Len Wells at WFIW News in Fairfield, Ill., Wayne County Clerk Glenda Young stands outside the Wayne County Courthouse in Fairfield with a book of property records. Many southern Illinois counties have scored a bonanza from a land rush linked to the debated drilling practice speculators believe can tap long-inaccessible oil and natural gas. Hundreds of thousands of dollars of fees have flowed into county coffers by hordes of "land men," often out-of-staters who converged in recent years to scour title records for prime drillable parcels. Young estimates her office has collected $200,000 in such fees since 2011, plowing a chunk of that money into a soon-to-be-completed push to put her records online. (AP Photo/WFIW News, Len Wells)

Associated Press
In this Thursday, April 4, 2013 provided by Len Wells at WFIW News in Fairfield, Ill., Wayne County Clerk Glenda Young stands outside the Wayne County Courthouse in Fairfield with a book of property records. Many southern Illinois counties have scored a bonanza from a land rush linked to the debated drilling practice speculators believe can tap long-inaccessible oil and natural gas. Hundreds of thousands of dollars of fees have flowed into county coffers by hordes of "land men," often out-of-staters who converged in recent years to scour title records for prime drillable parcels. Young estimates her office has collected $200,000 in such fees since 2011, plowing a chunk of that money into a soon-to-be-completed push to put her records online. (AP Photo/WFIW News, Len Wells)
In this Thursday, April 4, 2013 provided by Len Wells at WFIW News in Fairfield, Ill., Wayne County Clerk Glenda Young stands outside the Wayne County Courthouse in Fairfield with a book of property records. Many southern Illinois counties have scored a bonanza from a land rush linked to the debated drilling practice speculators believe can tap long-inaccessible oil and natural gas. Hundreds of thousands of dollars of fees have flowed into county coffers by hordes of "land men," often out-of-staters who converged in recent years to scour title records for prime drillable parcels. Young estimates her office has collected $200,000 in such fees since 2011, plowing a chunk of that money into a soon-to-be-completed push to put her records online. (AP Photo/WFIW News, Len Wells)
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