In this Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012 photo, construction worker Abdul Razziq speaks during an interview in Kajaki, Helmand province, south of Kabul, Afghanistan. The number of workers on a U.S.-funded construction project next to Kajaki has dwindled from 200 to 20 since last fall, and those remaining say workers feel the risk isn't worth the $6 daily paycheck. "They can't come here because all the routes to the district are controlled by the Taliban," said Razziq, a 28-year-old villager working on construction of a new district government center next to the dam. (AP Photo/Heidi Vogt)

Associated Press
In this Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012 photo, construction worker Abdul Razziq speaks during an interview in Kajaki, Helmand province, south of Kabul, Afghanistan. The number of workers on a U.S.-funded construction project next to Kajaki has dwindled from 200 to 20 since last fall, and those remaining say workers feel the risk isn't worth the $6 daily paycheck. "They can't come here because all the routes to the district are controlled by the Taliban," said Razziq, a 28-year-old villager working on construction of a new district government center next to the dam. (AP Photo/Heidi Vogt)
In this Thursday, Nov. 15, 2012 photo, construction worker Abdul Razziq speaks during an interview in Kajaki, Helmand province, south of Kabul, Afghanistan. The number of workers on a U.S.-funded construction project next to Kajaki has dwindled from 200 to 20 since last fall, and those remaining say workers feel the risk isn't worth the $6 daily paycheck. "They can't come here because all the routes to the district are controlled by the Taliban," said Razziq, a 28-year-old villager working on construction of a new district government center next to the dam. (AP Photo/Heidi Vogt)
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