In this Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 photo, Jason Garcia, a field inspector with the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District, tests a sprayer that could be used in the future to spray pesticides to control mosquitos in Key West, Fla. The British company Oxitec and mosquito control officials hope to release genetically modified mosquitoes to control the Aedes aegypti mosquito population, that can transmit dengue fever, without using pesticides and at relatively a low cost. But some Key West residents and environmental groups think the genetically modified mosquitoes pose a bigger threat than regular dengue or even dengue hemorrhagic fever. They worry the modified genetic material will somehow be passed to humans and the Keys ecosystem and they want more research into the potential risks. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Associated Press
In this Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 photo, Jason Garcia, a field inspector with the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District, tests a sprayer that could be used in the future to spray pesticides to control mosquitos in Key West, Fla. The British company Oxitec and mosquito control officials hope to release genetically modified mosquitoes to control the Aedes aegypti mosquito population, that can transmit dengue fever, without using pesticides and at relatively a low cost. But some Key West residents and environmental groups think the genetically modified mosquitoes pose a bigger threat than regular dengue or even dengue hemorrhagic fever. They worry the modified genetic material will somehow be passed to humans and the Keys ecosystem and they want more research into the potential risks. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
In this Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 photo, Jason Garcia, a field inspector with the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District, tests a sprayer that could be used in the future to spray pesticides to control mosquitos in Key West, Fla. The British company Oxitec and mosquito control officials hope to release genetically modified mosquitoes to control the Aedes aegypti mosquito population, that can transmit dengue fever, without using pesticides and at relatively a low cost. But some Key West residents and environmental groups think the genetically modified mosquitoes pose a bigger threat than regular dengue or even dengue hemorrhagic fever. They worry the modified genetic material will somehow be passed to humans and the Keys ecosystem and they want more research into the potential risks. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
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