In this Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012 photo, brochures are displayed in the Burmese and English language at the Burmese Advocacy Center in Fort Wayne, Ind. The center, which is funded by federal grants and private donations, helps refugees find jobs and homes and navigate issues from laws and customs to getting a driver’s license. Fort Wayne, home to one of the United States' largest Burmese populations, has become an unlikely base for opposition to the country's former military regime. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Associated Press
In this Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012 photo, brochures are displayed in the Burmese and English language at the Burmese Advocacy Center in Fort Wayne, Ind. The center, which is funded by federal grants and private donations, helps refugees find jobs and homes and navigate issues from laws and customs to getting a driver’s license. Fort Wayne, home to one of the United States' largest Burmese populations, has become an unlikely base for opposition to the country's former military regime. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
In this Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012 photo, brochures are displayed in the Burmese and English language at the Burmese Advocacy Center in Fort Wayne, Ind. The center, which is funded by federal grants and private donations, helps refugees find jobs and homes and navigate issues from laws and customs to getting a driver’s license. Fort Wayne, home to one of the United States' largest Burmese populations, has become an unlikely base for opposition to the country's former military regime. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
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