Tim Gibson, right, gestures beside Bill Thomas as the men discuss the possibility of bankruptcy for the city of Stockton Wednesday, Feb. 29, 2012, in Stockton, Calif. A red, white and blue sign declaring Stockton an “All-America City” still adorns City Hall, but the building’s crumbling facade tells the real story of the community’s recent fortunes. Since the sign went up nearly a decade ago, Stockton has twice topped Forbes magazine’s list of “America’s most miserable cities.” And now another unflattering title could be headed its way: largest American city to declare bankruptcy. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Associated Press
Tim Gibson, right, gestures beside Bill Thomas as the men discuss the possibility of bankruptcy for the city of Stockton Wednesday, Feb. 29, 2012, in Stockton, Calif. A red, white and blue sign declaring Stockton an “All-America City” still adorns City Hall, but the building’s crumbling facade tells the real story of the community’s recent fortunes. Since the sign went up nearly a decade ago, Stockton has twice topped Forbes magazine’s list of “America’s most miserable cities.” And now another unflattering title could be headed its way: largest American city to declare bankruptcy. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Tim Gibson, right, gestures beside Bill Thomas as the men discuss the possibility of bankruptcy for the city of Stockton Wednesday, Feb. 29, 2012, in Stockton, Calif. A red, white and blue sign declaring Stockton an “All-America City” still adorns City Hall, but the building’s crumbling facade tells the real story of the community’s recent fortunes. Since the sign went up nearly a decade ago, Stockton has twice topped Forbes magazine’s list of “America’s most miserable cities.” And now another unflattering title could be headed its way: largest American city to declare bankruptcy. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
View Comments (0)