2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

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  • Early Glance: Railroad companies

    Shares of some top railroad companies are up at 10 a.m.: CSX rose $.12 or .4 percent, to $28.50. Canadian National Railway Co. rose $.39 or .7 percent, to $55.55. Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. rose $1.97 ...

  • 10 Things to Know for Today
    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

  • Nasdaq stocks posting largest percentage increases

    A look at the 10 biggest percentage gainers on Nasdaq at the close of trading: China Information Technology Inc. rose 18.9 percent to $5.23. Conn's Inc. rose 14.5 percent to $45.48. BioFuel Energy rose ...

  • Ukraine launches 'gradual' operation, action limited
    Ukraine launches 'gradual' operation, action limited

    By Gabriela Baczynska and Thomas Grove KRAMATORSK/SLAVIANSK, Ukraine (Reuters) - Ukrainian forces launched a "special operation" on Tuesday against separatist militia in the Russian-speaking East, authorities said, although aside from a landing by airborne troops the action was limited. In Kiev, acting President Oleksander Turchinov declared a much-needed victory over pro-Russian rebels by saying the air base had been "liberated." But there was no sign of militants. A senior Ukrainian officer told the unarmed crowd that he had come to direct an "anti-terrorist operation" that Turchinov announced earlier in the day, after more than a week of missed deadlines set by Kiev for armed pro-Moscow activists to end occupations of public buildings in some 10 places in the east. Ukraine's state security service said an "anti-terrorist" operation was also in progress against separatists in the nearby town of Slaviansk but there was no immediate evidence of action.

  • Russian aircraft buzz US Navy destroyer: How big a deal?

    When Russian attack aircraft buzzed the USS Donald Cook in the international waters of the Black Sea, even as tensions in the region ratchet up, Pentagon officials decried the move as “provocative.” How big a deal are these “provocative” actions on the part of the Russian military – or were these just a couple of rogue Russian pilots out for a joy ride? During the cold war, these sorts of flybys “happened all the time,” says Christopher Harmer, a retired Navy officer who served as deputy director of future operations for the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet. In fact, these kinds of incidents happen more often than ever makes it into the press, says Mr. Harmer, now a senior naval analyst with the Institute for the Study of War in Washington.

  • Birmingham probes Muslim takeover of schools 'plot'
    Birmingham probes Muslim takeover of schools 'plot'

    Birmingham launched a probe Monday into an alleged hardline Muslim plot to take control of schools. The city council said it had appointed a chief adviser to examine at least 200 complaints as the investigation widened to 25 schools from an initial four.

  • Possible Mars Mission 'Showstopper': Vision Risks for Astronauts
    Possible Mars Mission 'Showstopper': Vision Risks for Astronauts

    Mars may possess a stark and austere beauty, but a manned Red Planet mission will likely not be easy on the eyes. Recently, scientists have begun realizing that spaceflight can cause serious and perhaps permanent vision problems in astronauts. NASA researchers are working hard to understand the issue, which could present a major hurdle to mounting manned missions to Mars and other faraway destinations. "This is one that we don't yet have a good handle on, and it can be a showstopper," Mark Shelhamer, chief scientist for the NASA Human Research Program at Johnson Space Center in Houston, said last week during a presentation with the agency's Future In-Space Operations (FISO) working group.

  • Handless cleric's own words to be used against him in U.S. trial

    By Joseph Ax NEW YORK (Reuters) - Prosecutors can use radical preacher Abu Hamza al-Masri's own inflammatory words against him during his trial in New York on terrorism-related charges, including praise for Osama bin Laden and for the September 11, 2001, attacks, a federal judge ruled on Tuesday. The decision came two days before opening statements are scheduled to take place in Manhattan federal court. Lawyers for Abu Hamza had argued that video and audio recordings of Abu Hamza justifying violence against non-Muslims would unfairly taint the jurors' emotions, making it impossible for him to have a fair verdict. But U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest said most of the tapes can be played for the jury to show Abu Hamza's state of mind and his willingness to provide aid to militant organizations.

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