2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

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  • Heartbreaking texts from students on sinking S. Korea ferry
    Heartbreaking texts from students on sinking S. Korea ferry

    Heart-wrenching messages of fear, love and despair, sent by high school students from a sinking South Korean ferry, added extra emotional weight Thursday to a tragedy that has stunned the nation. Nearly 300 people -- most of them students on a high school trip to a holiday island -- are still missing after the ferry capsized and sank on Wednesday morning. Mom, I love you," student Shin Young-Jin said in a text to his mother that was widely circulated in the South Korean media. Another student, 16-year-old Kim Woong-Ki, sent a desperate text for help to his elder brother as the ship listed violently over to one side.

  • Toyota Camry gets a top-to-bottom makeover
    Toyota Camry gets a top-to-bottom makeover

    NEW YORK (AP) — Shaken by the advances of newer, sportier rivals, the Toyota Camry is trying to shed its vanilla reputation.

  • Mom Tells Disabled Daughter Boston Marathon Bombs are Fireworks at Finish Line
    Mom Tells Disabled Daughter Boston Marathon Bombs are Fireworks at Finish Line

    Kristine and Kayla Biagiotti Were Feet From the Finish Line

  • Machines Compete In Biggest Stacking Game You Have Ever Seen
    Machines Compete In Biggest Stacking Game You Have Ever Seen

    And you thought picking a block out of the Jenga tower with your in-laws watching was nerve-wracking. In a new ad campaign titled "Built For It," Caterpillar Inc. decided to supersize its own version of the popular game so it could show off the precision of its excavators. Game aficionados and fans of Cat's large machines can appreciate the excavators and telehandlers moving 27 blocks that weigh 600 pounds each!

  • Ex-Minnesota State, Mankato coach returning to job

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The football coach fired from Minnesota State, Mankato announced Tuesday that he will return to the job after an arbitrator ruled he was wrongfully terminated, saying the decision wasn't easy but that it would help him and his family heal.

  • Why Putin’s Adventure in Ukraine Is Doomed
    Why Putin’s Adventure in Ukraine Is Doomed

    From Russian President Vladimir Putin’s perspective, the plan to annex parts of Ukraine probably goes something like this: take Crimea; “It is classic Russian foreign policy to try to destabilize a country before it completely takes it over,” said Edward Goldberg, a professor at Baruch College and the New York University Center for Global Affairs. “Russia has always considered Ukraine as a nation culturally and historically connected to it.” This plan had been unfolding just as Putin wanted--pro-Russia protestors have taken over government buildings in eastern Ukraine, while Russian troops wait at the border.

  • Family is key to understanding accused Boston bomber: attorney
    Family is key to understanding accused Boston bomber: attorney

    By Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) - The accused Boston Marathon bomber's relationship with family, and particularly with his slain older brother who prosecutors contend helped plan the attack, is key to understanding his case, defense lawyers argued on Wednesday. Attorneys for 20-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev argued in federal court that the defendant should be able to meet with his sisters without being monitored by an FBI agent cooperating with prosecutors, and needs access to more information investigators have gathered on his dead brother to mount a full defense to charges that carry the threat of execution. Tsarnaev is accused of planting two homemade bombs with his brother at the finish line of the April 15, 2013, Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264 and, three days later, in the shooting death of a university police officer. "Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is the youngest of three children.

  • APNewsBreak: Oracle says it's not to blame

    After six months of near silence about the problems at Cover Oregon, the project's main technology contractor says it's not to blame for the failed launch of Oregon's health insurance exchange. In a letter ...

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