2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

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  • Today in History

    Today is Monday, July 28, the 209th day of 2014. There are 156 days left in the year.

  • 10 Things to Know for Today
    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

  • Goodbye to glasses: TV, computer displays could adjust to meet vision needs
    Goodbye to glasses: TV, computer displays could adjust to meet vision needs

    Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are making vision correction the job of your device's display technology, eliminating the need for corrective lenses. In the technology, a given optical prescription is processed by means of algorithms and a light filter in front of the display. Researchers developed their technology in a study in which they started by taking bright colorful images of hot air balloons or paintings and warping them using the algorithms. To those with certain eye conditions, the images were far from warped: they were crystal clear upon reaching an iPod Touch equipped with a plastic light filter.

  • Reporter recalls Soviet evasion in '83 jet downing
    Reporter recalls Soviet evasion in '83 jet downing

    Those searching for the truth about what happened in the shoot-down of the Malaysia airliner over Ukraine can take little comfort from the history of another passenger jet that was blasted out of the sky over the Soviet Union more than three decades ago: The Kremlin at the time dodged, weaved and obfuscated. Today, we still don't know what exactly happened to Korean Airlines Flight 007.

  • Alien Smog: How Pollution Could Help Locate E.T.
    Alien Smog: How Pollution Could Help Locate E.T.

    In the search for life beyond Earth, astronomers should look for signs of pollution in the atmospheres of alien planets outside the Earth's solar system, a new study says. The next-generation James Webb Space Telescope, which is set to launch in 2018, could hunt for worlds harboring alien life by sniffing their atmospheres for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), greenhouse gases that destroy ozone in the Earth's atmosphere. Of course, to very advanced civilizations, Earth's own greenhouse gases might signal a primitive world, the scientists said. "We consider industrial pollution as a sign of intelligent life, but perhaps civilizations more advanced than us, with their own SETI programs, will consider pollution as a sign of unintelligent life since it's not smart to contaminate your own air," study leader Henry Lin, a student at Harvard University, said in a statement.

  • Cable on Ohio amusement park ride snaps, hurting 2
    Cable on Ohio amusement park ride snaps, hurting 2

    SANDUSKY, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio amusement park ride that swings riders as high as 125 feet has been closed indefinitely after a cable snapped, injuring two visitors.

  • 'Avengers' unleash 'Ultron' footage at Comic-Con
    'Avengers' unleash 'Ultron' footage at Comic-Con

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — Several members of "The Avengers" descended on Comic-Con on Saturday to debut the first footage from the upcoming superhero sequel.

  • Dozens of ill Keith Urban fans treated at concert near Boston

    Forty-six music fans were treated for mostly alcohol-related medical problems at Australian country singer Keith Urban's concert outside Boston on Saturday night, local officials said. Fire and emergency medical personnel dealt with dozens of ill fans during the show at an outdoor arena in Mansfield, Massachusetts, about 25 miles (40 km) south of Boston, the town's police and fire departments said in a joint statement on Sunday. "Last evening's Keith Urban concert was not anticipated to present with the volume of issues handled," officials said in the statement. The incident came a month after dozens of people were taken to hospitals for drug and alcohol-related illnesses at a house music concert at Boston's TD Garden.

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