2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

The standout news & pop obsessions gleaned from your search habits

Related Search Results

Loading...
  • NYSE stocks posting largest percentage decreases

    A look at the 10 biggest percentage decliners on New York Stock Exchange at 1 p.m.: Penn West Petroleum Ltd. fell 16.6 percent to $7.64. Ruby Tuesday fell 14.6 percent to $6.07. Genworth Financial Inc. ...

  • Final Glance: Railroad companies

    Shares of some top railroad companies were down at the close of trading: CSX fell $.21 or .7 percent, to $30.52. Canadian National Railway Co. fell $.77 or 1.1 percent, to $67.58. Canadian Pacific Railway ...

  • The insane process of connecting the world through undersea Internet cables
    The insane process of connecting the world through undersea Internet cables

    We’ve oohed and ahhed over interactive maps that detail the world’s mysterious network of undersea Internet cables, but a new report over at Builtvisible is taking things to an entirely new depth. The exhaustive account looks at the entire history of the process, ranging from experiments in the 1840s to a rash of undersea surveillance taps in the 1970s. Today, there are 263 active cables that carry upwards of 95 percent of global Internet traffic, with 22 new drops planned for the coming years. Hungry for a few more nuggets from the report? Underwater cables carried 51 billion gigabytes of data per month in 2013, and that figure is expected to swell to 132 billion gigabytes in 2018. While 10

  • After shaky start, Ukraine turns eastern offensive around
    After shaky start, Ukraine turns eastern offensive around

    When Ukraine's military offensive to oust pro-Russian rebels from the restive east began in mid-April with humiliated soldiers meekly surrendering their armoured vehicles it looked doomed to failure. Analysts say the dramatic turnaround is down to a combination of growing professionalism and ruthlessness from Kiev's forces on the one hand and the shifting nature of the support that Russia is giving the rebels. "The Ukrainian army is finding out how to fight as it goes along and has shown how capable it is of learning," said Valentyn Badrak, director of the Research Centre for the Army, Demilitarisation and Disarmament in Kiev. Poorly coordinated, riddled by corruption and low on morale after the humbling loss of Crimea to Russia in March, Ukraine's military has undergone a radical shakeup after drafting highly motivated volunteers and improving its leadership.

  • What not to buy on Amazon
    What not to buy on Amazon

    Many of us assume Amazon has the best prices on everything, but there are some thing that can be found cheaper elsewhere.

  • Study: 35 percent in US facing debt collectors
    Study: 35 percent in US facing debt collectors

    More than 35 percent of Americans have debts and unpaid bills that have been reported to collection agencies, according to a study released Tuesday by the Urban Institute. These consumers fall behind on ...

  • Convicted cop killer told to stop coaching youth baseball
    Convicted cop killer told to stop coaching youth baseball

    In 1988, John Matthews, an off-duty Chicago-area police officer, was beaten to death with a baseball bat by a group of young men. One of those men, Dean Chavez, served 11 years in prison for his role in the death.

  • European ransoms now Al-Qaeda's major funding: NYTimes
    European ransoms now Al-Qaeda's major funding: NYTimes

    Al-Qaeda is increasingly funding terror operations thanks to at least $125 million in ransom paid since 2008, largely by European governments to free western hostages, the New York Times reported. While Al-Qaeda's network was first funded by wealthy donors, "kidnapping for ransom has become today’s most significant source of terrorist financing," said David S. Cohen, the Treasury Department’s under secretary for terrorism and financial intelligence, in a 2012 speech. "Kidnapping hostages is an easy spoil," wrote Nasser al-Wuhayshi, the leader of Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, "which I may describe as a profitable trade and a precious treasure." The paper listed more than $90 million paid to Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb since 2008 -- by a Switzerland, Spain, Austria, and state-controlled French company and two payments from undetermined sources.

Loading...

Follow Yahoo! News