The storm comes in fast, a cold downdraft blasting the crowd of people standing on a remote dirt road. Storm chasing has become a full-time business for people. Customers fly into Denver and climb ... more 
The storm comes in fast, a cold downdraft blasting the crowd of people standing on a remote dirt road. Storm chasing has become a full-time business for people. Customers fly into Denver and climb aboard vans fitted with laptops, two-way radios and GPS trackers, all to see the extreme weather that builds along a corridor spanning eastern Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, and the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles. Whether on their own or with a guided tour, storm chasers travel hundreds of miles in a single day, leapfrogging storms as they blow east. On back roads and isolated pulloffs, dozens of vehicles will suddenly converge, their occupants piling out to photograph and shoot video of towering stormfronts, intense hail, and, if they get lucky, an actual tornado. less 
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Wochit
Sat, Jun 7, 2014 12:00 PM EDT