This undated handout images provided by Science Traditional Medicine/Scripps Translational Science Institute, shows on the left normal, healthy circulating endothelial cells (CEC). On the right are CECs from heart attack patients which appear abnormally large, misshapen and with multiple nuclei. Too often, people pass a cardiac checkup only to collapse with a heart attack days later. Now scientists have found a clue that one day may help doctors determine if a heart attack is imminent, in hopes of preventing it. (AP Photo/Scripps Translational Science Institute)

Associated Press
This undated handout images provided by Science Traditional Medicine/Scripps Translational Science Institute, shows on the left normal, healthy circulating endothelial cells (CEC). On the right are CECs from heart attack patients which appear abnormally large, misshapen and with multiple nuclei. Too often, people pass a cardiac checkup only to collapse with a heart attack days later. Now scientists have found a clue that one day may help doctors determine if a heart attack is imminent, in hopes of preventing it. (AP Photo/Scripps Translational Science Institute)
This undated handout images provided by Science Traditional Medicine/Scripps Translational Science Institute, shows on the left normal, healthy circulating endothelial cells (CEC). On the right are CECs from heart attack patients which appear abnormally large, misshapen and with multiple nuclei. Too often, people pass a cardiac checkup only to collapse with a heart attack days later. Now scientists have found a clue that one day may help doctors determine if a heart attack is imminent, in hopes of preventing it. (AP Photo/Scripps Translational Science Institute)
View Comments (0)