This is an undated image released by the Natural History Museum in on Wednesday Dec. 12, 2012 of the Piltdown skull. It was an archaeological hoax that fooled scientists for decades. A century on, researchers are determined to find out who was responsible for Piltdown Man, the missing link that never was. In December 1912, a lawyer and amateur archaeologist named Charles Dawson announced he'd made an astonishing discovery in a gravel pit in southern England _ prehistoric remains, up to 1 million years old, that combined the skull of a human and the jaw of an ape. It was 40 years before the find was exposed as a hoax by scientists at London's Natural History Museum _ the same institution that had announced the find in 1912. The museum is marking the 100th anniversary of the hoax with a new push to find out who did it _ and why. (AP Photo/Natural History Museum) NO ARCHIVE

Associated Press
This is an undated image released by the Natural History Museum in on Wednesday Dec. 12, 2012 of the Piltdown skull. It was an archaeological hoax that fooled scientists for decades. A century on, researchers are determined to find out who was responsible for Piltdown Man, the missing link that never was. In December 1912, a lawyer and amateur archaeologist named Charles Dawson announced he'd made an astonishing discovery in a gravel pit in southern England _ prehistoric remains, up to 1 million years old, that combined the skull of a human and the jaw of an ape.  It was 40 years before the find was exposed as a hoax by scientists at London's Natural History Museum _ the same institution that had announced the find in 1912. The museum is marking the 100th anniversary of the hoax with a new push to find out who did it _ and why. (AP Photo/Natural History Museum) NO ARCHIVE
This is an undated image released by the Natural History Museum in on Wednesday Dec. 12, 2012 of the Piltdown skull. It was an archaeological hoax that fooled scientists for decades. A century on, researchers are determined to find out who was responsible for Piltdown Man, the missing link that never was. In December 1912, a lawyer and amateur archaeologist named Charles Dawson announced he'd made an astonishing discovery in a gravel pit in southern England _ prehistoric remains, up to 1 million years old, that combined the skull of a human and the jaw of an ape. It was 40 years before the find was exposed as a hoax by scientists at London's Natural History Museum _ the same institution that had announced the find in 1912. The museum is marking the 100th anniversary of the hoax with a new push to find out who did it _ and why. (AP Photo/Natural History Museum) NO ARCHIVE
View Comments (0)