This undated photo provided by Dr. James McGraw at West Virginia University in West Virginia shows a wild ginseng plant with berries. A new breed of ginseng diggers looking for a quick buck has taken things to a new level, eschewing harvesting permits and ripping up immature ginseng before it can produce seeds, jeopardizing the plant’s long-term future. (AP Photo/West Virginia University)

Associated Press
This undated photo provided by Dr. James McGraw at West Virginia University in West Virginia shows a wild ginseng plant with berries. A new breed of ginseng diggers looking for a quick buck has taken things to a new level, eschewing harvesting permits and ripping up immature ginseng before it can produce seeds, jeopardizing the plant’s long-term future.  (AP Photo/West Virginia University)
This undated photo provided by Dr. James McGraw at West Virginia University in West Virginia shows a wild ginseng plant with berries. A new breed of ginseng diggers looking for a quick buck has taken things to a new level, eschewing harvesting permits and ripping up immature ginseng before it can produce seeds, jeopardizing the plant’s long-term future. (AP Photo/West Virginia University)
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