This undated photo provided by the Office of the Attorney General of Florida shows fugitive Miami Dr. Armando Angulo. Angulo, charged in the nation's largest prosecution of Internet pharmacies, is getting off in part because of the huge volume of evidence in his case: more than 400,000 documents and two terabytes of electronic data that federal authorities say is too expensive to maintain. The case started in 2003 with a raid of a small Iowa drugstore, Union Family Pharmacy in Dubuque, and dismantled two Internet pharmacies that illegally sold 30 million pills to customers. (AP Photo/Attorney General of Florida)

Associated Press
This undated photo provided by the Office of the Attorney General of Florida shows fugitive Miami Dr. Armando Angulo. Angulo, charged in the nation's largest prosecution of Internet pharmacies, is getting off in part because of the huge volume of evidence in his case: more than 400,000 documents and two terabytes of electronic data that federal authorities say is too expensive to maintain. The case started in 2003 with a raid of a small Iowa drugstore, Union Family Pharmacy in Dubuque, and dismantled two Internet pharmacies that illegally sold 30 million pills to customers. (AP Photo/Attorney General of Florida)
This undated photo provided by the Office of the Attorney General of Florida shows fugitive Miami Dr. Armando Angulo. Angulo, charged in the nation's largest prosecution of Internet pharmacies, is getting off in part because of the huge volume of evidence in his case: more than 400,000 documents and two terabytes of electronic data that federal authorities say is too expensive to maintain. The case started in 2003 with a raid of a small Iowa drugstore, Union Family Pharmacy in Dubuque, and dismantled two Internet pharmacies that illegally sold 30 million pills to customers. (AP Photo/Attorney General of Florida)
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