An undated photo released Thursday May 26, 2011 by the University of Warwick of astronomer Dr. Andrew Levan who was one of the first members of the team to spot an exploding star. A group of ... more 
An undated photo released Thursday May 26, 2011 by the University of Warwick of astronomer Dr. Andrew Levan who was one of the first members of the team to spot an exploding star. A group of researchers claim they've found the most distant explosion ever detected, a pulse of gamma radiation sent by a disintegrating star more than 13 billion light years away. The stellar blast was first sniffed out by a NASA satellite in April 2009, but researchers announced Wednesday that they've since gathered data placing it near the very edge of the observable universe. The explosion identified by the scientists wasn't a supernova but a gamma ray burst, the name given to a short but powerful pulse of high energy radiation. Such bursts are thought to result from the collapse of massive stars into black holes, and the amount of energy they release is mind-boggling. less 
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Associated Press | Photo By HO University of Warwick
Thu, May 26, 2011 9:56 AM EDT