Xu Haifeng poses at a construction site area where her house stood in Wuxi, Jiangsu province, August 20, 2013. When Xu's home was razed three years ago, she went to China's capital Beijing to complain... more 
Xu Haifeng poses at a construction site area where her house stood in Wuxi, Jiangsu province, August 20, 2013. When Xu's home was razed three years ago, she went to China's capital Beijing to complain about the city and county governments that ordered the demolition. Since then she says family members have been kidnapped at least 18 times, typically having black bags thrust over their heads before being taken to a hotel-turned-illegal jail in the eastern city of Wuxi and locked for weeks in a tiny, windowless room. Xu's story is shocking even in a country that has become used to tales of arbitrary and sometimes violent land expropriations. It illustrates how the stresses from the deep indebtedness of China's local governments extend beyond banks into the lives of ordinary Chinese, as hard-up authorities resort to any means they can in a desperate scramble for funds. Picture taken August 20, 2013. REUTERS/Carlos Baria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION POLITICS LAW) less 
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Reuters | Photo By CARLOS BARRIA / Reuters
Mon, Sep 2, 2013 5:23 PM EDT