2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

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  • Miley Cyrus Is Not Wearing Clothes On Her Latest Magazine Cover
    Miley Cyrus Is Not Wearing Clothes On Her Latest Magazine Cover

    Miley Cyrus usually looks like she’s not wearing any clothes, but on the upcoming issue of V Magazine she is actually not wearing any clothes. She’s naked on top of a pile of stuffed animals on the magazine’s “Rebel Issue,” shot by Karl Lagerfeld, and the concept of it fits Miley perfectly.

  • Teen Vandals Literally Caught Red-Handed
    Teen Vandals Literally Caught Red-Handed

    Potential crooks are figuratively caught red-handed all the time, from kids breaking into a box of cookies before dinner to the more serious grown-up crimes. But has anyone ever been caught with red-colored hands? Probably. But maybe not like this. Early Thursday morning at 3:20, officers from the New York Police Department arrested 17-year-old Mike Kushnir and an unnamed 15-year-old female friend after they received a 911 call. The two teenagers have been accused of vandalizing the 114-year-old Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial Monument on Riverside Drive and West 89th Street on Manhattan's Upper West Side.

  • Zimbabwe 1st lady roils political scene with entry
    Zimbabwe 1st lady roils political scene with entry

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — She has expensive tastes, owns a lot of land in Zimbabwe and is now entering politics, a move that is roiling this southern African nation that has known only one leader since independence: President Robert Mugabe, who is 90 years old.

  • S&P 500 above 2,000 "has been a problem before": Matt Krantz
    S&P 500 above 2,000 "has been a problem before": Matt Krantz

    USA Today markets reporter Matt Krantz discusses what investors can expect now that the S&P 500 has closed above 2,000 for the past three trading sessions though it opened below that today.

  • Cuban migrants head back to sea after being turned away in Caymans

    By Peter Polack GEORGE TOWN Cayman Islands (Reuters) - Sixteen Cuban migrants who sought refuge in Grand Cayman have resumed their voyage in a small, homemade aluminum boat after local officials turned them away, citing a migration agreement with Cuba. They were last seen being trailed by a police boat and helicopter about five miles (8 km) off Grand Cayman, drifting west in five foot (1.5 meter) waves with a squall approaching. Boats smuggling Cubans who are seeking to flee the communist-run island are frequently seen off the Cayman Islands, located in the Caribbean less than 100 miles (160 km) south of Cuba. "We left (Cuba) because there are no jobs or the basic items for living," said the boat captain, who was briefly interviewed close to shore before the boat departed.

  • What If Teachers Were Paid Like Athletes?
    What If Teachers Were Paid Like Athletes?

    No one will be ‘too cool for school’ ever again .

  • Islamic State's appeal presents Jordan with new test

    By Suleiman Al-Khalidi AMMAN (Reuters) - He had a good job and a loving family, but it wasn't enough for a 25-year old Jordanian who abandoned his life of privilege in Amman to join the Islamic State group that has seized swathes of neighboring Iraq and Syria. He is among the first known cases of Jordanians joining Islamic State since the group declared a "caliphate" in June after dramatic territorial gains in Iraq and Syria. His story points to the widening support for Islamic State among Jordanian Islamist fundamentalists inspired by its recent advances in countries that border Jordan to the east and north. Islamic State's gains have sparked a fierce debate among Jordanian Islamists from the ultra-orthodox Salafist movement on whether to back the group, whose brutality has been criticized even within radical Islamist circles.

  • North Korean leader's money manager defects in Russia: South Korea newspaper
    North Korean leader's money manager defects in Russia: South Korea newspaper

    By Ju-min Park and James Pearson SEOUL (Reuters) - A senior North Korean banking official who managed money for leader Kim Jong Un has defected in Russia and was seeking asylum in a third country, a South Korean newspaper reported on Friday, citing an unidentified source. Yun Tae Hyong, a senior representative of North Korea's Korea Daesong Bank, disappeared last week in Nakhodka, in the Russian Far East, with $5 million, the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper reported. The Daesong Bank is suspected by the U.S. The newspaper said North Korea had asked Russian authorities for cooperation in efforts to capture Yun.

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