2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

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  • Radio star Casey Kasem's remains flown to Canada: agent

    (Reuters) - The body of radio personality Casey Kasem, who even before his June death was at the center of a tug-of-war between his wife and his children from a prior marriage, has been flown to Canada from a Washington state funeral home, his longtime former agent said on Wednesday. Kasem, the former host of the syndicated program "American Top 40," was moved to Canada by his wife, his agent Don Pitts said, after being kept at the Gaffney Funeral Home in Tacoma, Washington. Candace Corkum, administrative manager for the funeral home, confirmed on Friday that Kasem's body was no longer at the facility. Kasem had been the focus of a dispute between his three children from his first marriage - Kerri, Julie and Mike - and his second wife, Jean Kasem.

  • Musician Nas finds his family tree in PBS series
    Musician Nas finds his family tree in PBS series

    BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — When Nas became the first rapper invited to trace his family tree through the PBS series "Finding Your Roots," he welcomed the opportunity.

  • Exclusive: Ukraine rebel commander acknowledges fighters had BUK missile
    Exclusive: Ukraine rebel commander acknowledges fighters had BUK missile

    By Anton Zverev DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) - A powerful Ukrainian rebel leader has confirmed that pro-Russian separatists had an anti-aircraft missile of the type Washington says was used to shoot down Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 and it could have originated in Russia. In an interview with Reuters, Alexander Khodakovsky, commander of the Vostok Battalion, acknowledged for the first time since the airliner was brought down in eastern Ukraine on Thursday that the rebels did possess the BUK missile system and said it could have been sent back subsequently to remove proof of its presence. Before the Malaysian plane was shot down, rebels had boasted of obtaining the BUK missiles, which can shoot down airliners at cruising height.

  • Fighting rages by Russia-Ukraine border as two jets downed
    Fighting rages by Russia-Ukraine border as two jets downed

    Rolling hills, sleepy villages and the crackle of gunfire: the area where two Ukrainian fighter jets were downed on Wednesday is a surreal warzone near the flight MH17 crash site. While OSCE monitors examined the abandoned debris from the Malaysia Airlines plane, the fighting raged some 45 kilometres (25 miles) to the south near Savur Mogila -- an ancient holy site and World War II monument.

  • Russia starts reinforcing naval fleet in Crimea
    Russia starts reinforcing naval fleet in Crimea

    Russia announced Wednesday that it had begun expanding and modernising its Black Sea fleet based in Crimea with new ships and submarines, just months after annexing the peninsula from Ukraine. "Today we have started forming a powerful Black Sea fleet with an absolutely different level of air service, coastal missile and artillery troops and marines," said Alexander Vitko, the Black Sea fleet commander, in a message to servicemen. Russia's Black Sea fleet had a base at the historic port city of Sevastopol in Crimea under an agreement with Ukraine before Russia annexed the peninsula in March.

  • Thousands attend tense pro-Gaza march in Paris
    Thousands attend tense pro-Gaza march in Paris

    PARIS (AP) — Days after two banned pro-Gaza protests degenerated into violence, several thousands of demonstrators marched Wednesday through Paris under the eye of hundreds of riot police, this time in a legal protest.

  • As Phone Growth Slows, Carriers Turn to Tablets
    As Phone Growth Slows, Carriers Turn to Tablets

    Carriers have found the answer in tablets, which represent one of the few places where the industry can wring out a new source of revenue after the companies have nearly tapped out smartphone upgrades. Rather, the majority of tablet sales are upgrades to existing customer plans. The lifetime value of a tablet customer to a wireless carrier is $761, about one-third of that of a handset customer, according to New Street Research. "They now represent success in up-selling tablets to the base, rather than reflecting shifts in subscriber market share between carriers."

  • Dutch Mayor Sorry he Said Putin's Daughter Should be Deported From Netherlands
    Dutch Mayor Sorry he Said Putin's Daughter Should be Deported From Netherlands

    Mayor Later Apologized, Said Comments Stem From 'Helplessness'

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