2012 YEAR IN REVIEW

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  • 8 Things You Forgot About the Cold War
    8 Things You Forgot About the Cold War

    Things Get Weird When the U.S. and Russia Are At Odds

  • Stowaway Teen Said He Ran Away From Home After an Argument With Parents
    Stowaway Teen Said He Ran Away From Home After an Argument With Parents

    The 15-Year-Old Told an Airport Official He Was Angry After the Argument

  • Did you miss last week’s blood moon? Check out this awesome time-lapse photo
    Did you miss last week’s blood moon? Check out this awesome time-lapse photo

    Last week’s rare blood moon eclipse was amazing, but it also took place in the middle of the night so most people in the U.S. probably missed it. But there is no need to fret, of course — that’s why Al Gore invented the Internet. We have all undoubtedly seen photos of the blood moon eclipse that took place in the wee hours of the morning on April 15th. It was the first of four coming eclipses where the moon will glow red in the sky, so three more opportunities to catch one are coming. Those who don’t feel like waiting for October to see the next blood moon are in luck though, because Wired posted a great little GIF on

  • How Chicago Became ‘Chiraq’
    How Chicago Became ‘Chiraq’

    This Easter weekend, 45 people were shot in the city that’s come to be known as ‘Chiraq.’ And until Obama can get the guns off the streets of his hometown, the bloodshed won’t stop.

  • In Ukraine's east, mayor held hostage by insurgent
    In Ukraine's east, mayor held hostage by insurgent

    SLOVYANSK, Ukraine (AP) — When armed men seized the police station in this eastern Ukrainian city, mayor Nelya Shtepa declared she was on their side. She changed her story a few days later. Then she disappeared — the victim of an apparent abduction by the man who now lays claim to her job.

  • Canada aims to ease whale protection as pipeline decision looms

    By Julie Gordon VANCOUVER (Reuters) - Canada has recommended taking humpback whales off the "threatened" species list, two months before the government is due to decide whether to approve a proposed pipeline that would lead to half a million barrels of oil being shipped through their Pacific marine habitat every year. The Department of the Environment released a document over the Easter holiday that recommends the North Pacific humpback whales should now be labeled a "species of special concern." The change of classification means the humpback's habitat would no longer be protected under Canada's Species at Risk Act, thereby removing some of the risk of legal battles with environmental groups that could scupper Enbridge Inc's controversial Northern Gateway pipeline project. "It's a very cynical political move that is not based in science, designed solely to permit the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline to be approved by removing the designation of critical habitat for the whales," said Karen Wristen, executive director of marine conservation group Living Oceans Society.

  • World's Largest Weenie Roast? Where Recalled Hot Dogs May Go
    World's Largest Weenie Roast? Where Recalled Hot Dogs May Go

    The 96,000 pounds of Oscar Mayer wieners recalled by Kraft may have a fighting chance of making it to the grill after all. “When we issue a recall, we always put safety first,”  Joyce Hodel of Kraft Corporate Affairs told ABCNews.com. “If the recalled product...

  • Neanderthals Had Shallow Gene Pool, Study Says
    Neanderthals Had Shallow Gene Pool, Study Says

    Neanderthals were remarkably less genetically diverse than modern humans, with Neanderthal populations typically smaller and more isolated, researchers say. Modern humans are the only humans alive today, but Earth was once home to a variety of other human lineages. The Neanderthals were once the closest relatives of modern humans, with the common ancestors of modern humans and Neanderthals divergingbetween 550,000 and 765,000 years ago. Neanderthals and modern humans later interbred — nowadays, about 1.5 to 2.1 percent of DNA of people outside Africa is Neanderthal in origin.

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