Zayna Abdul, 34, an Abigail Michaels concierge, works at her desk in the the Mercedes House apartments, in New York, Monday, March 25, 2013. A brownstone overlooking Central Park is no longer enough for the well-to-do New Yorker on the hunt for an apartment. What the very wealthy want now is the ease of hotel living in their own apartment buildings. That means room service delivered from the restaurant down the street, a concierge who will handle even the most outlandish requests and, of course, a spa in the lobby. There is no amenity left behind in Manhattan's soaring luxury real estate market.(AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Associated Press
Zayna Abdul, 34, an Abigail Michaels concierge, works at her desk in the the Mercedes House apartments, in New York,  Monday, March 25, 2013. A brownstone overlooking Central Park is no longer enough for the well-to-do New Yorker on the hunt for an apartment. What the very wealthy want now is the ease of hotel living in their own apartment buildings. That means room service delivered from the restaurant down the street, a concierge who will handle even the most outlandish requests and, of course, a spa in the lobby. There is no amenity left behind in Manhattan's soaring luxury real estate market.(AP Photo/Richard Drew)
Zayna Abdul, 34, an Abigail Michaels concierge, works at her desk in the the Mercedes House apartments, in New York, Monday, March 25, 2013. A brownstone overlooking Central Park is no longer enough for the well-to-do New Yorker on the hunt for an apartment. What the very wealthy want now is the ease of hotel living in their own apartment buildings. That means room service delivered from the restaurant down the street, a concierge who will handle even the most outlandish requests and, of course, a spa in the lobby. There is no amenity left behind in Manhattan's soaring luxury real estate market.(AP Photo/Richard Drew)
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