Police: Pa. couple sold neighbor's lost puppy

Associated Press

LEECHBURG, Pa. (AP) — Police say a Pennsylvania couple sold a neighbor's lost puppy for $50 rather than return it to its owner.

Police in Leechburg, about 25 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, say a golden retriever and a Rottweiler puppy wandered onto the property of Scott and Roxanne Duff on Sept. 3. Police say the couple helped return the golden retriever to its owner, but they told officers that the puppy had run away.

Police tell the Valley News Dispatch (http://bit.ly/PH130q) the Duffs really sold the puppy to a Pittsburgh woman through Craigslist. The dog has since been returned.

The Duffs' phone was disconnected Wednesday. Online court records don't list an attorney for them. They are charged with conspiracy, not making a reasonable effort to return lost property and making a false report.


Information from: Valley News Dispatch, http://www.valleynewsdispatch.com

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