President says GOP creating 'fictional' Obama

Associated Press
President Barack Obama waves as he arrives at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport in Kenner, La., Monday, Sept. 3, 2012. (AP Photo/Jonathan Bachman)

View photo

President Barack Obama waves as he arrives at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport in Kenner, …

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — President Barack Obama says Republicans are creating a "fictional Barack Obama" during the White House campaign by misrepresenting his positions and words.

Obama says GOP rival Mitt Romney has made disputed allegations the "centerpieces" of his campaign. The president singled out Romney's claim that he stripped a work requirement out of federal welfare laws, a Romney assertion that has been widely debunked.

The president said Romney didn't spend a lot of time at the GOP convention talking about how he would make Americans' lives better. He says Romney's strategy must be to convince the public that getting rid of Obama will be enough to turn things around.

Obama spoke in an interview with USA Today.

Sorry you didn't like this comment. Please provide a reason below.

Are you sure?
Rating failed. Try again.
Request failed. Try again.
We will promote constructive and witty comments to the top, so everyone sees them!
Sorry, we can’t load comments right now. Try again.

    Recommended for You

    • AP Top 25: Ohio State slips, Penn State in, Houston out

      Ohio State dropped four spots to No. 6 in The Associated Press college football poll after its first loss of the season, and Penn State moved into the rankings for the first time since 2011 after upsetting ...

      Associated Press
    • Civil rights hero from 60s takes criticism as Trump backer

      HIGH POINT, N.C. (AP) — Clarence Henderson was hailed as a hero nearly 60 years ago when as a young black man he participated in a sit-in at a segregated North Carolina lunch counter.

      Associated Press
    • Model 3 could be Tesla's most reliable car — here's why

      Tesla's low ranking in a recent Consumer Reports reliability survey reveals something compelling about the Model 3.

    • Grandmother of Five Among 13 Dead in California Tour Bus Crash

      A tour bus collided with a semi-tractor trailer Sunday while the group was en route to Los Angeles from the Salton Sea area.

      Inside Edition
    • We just entered an alarming 'new era' of global warming

      The Earth permanently passed a global warming threshold last year that alarms climate scientists and has profound consequences for everyone alive today — particularly young people looking forward to the future.  According to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), observatories around the world found that in 2015 and 2016, the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere crossed the symbolic threshold of 400 parts per million (ppm), and that this is likely to remain the case for the foreseeable future.  SEE ALSO: The Great Barrier Reef isn't dead, despite its viral obituary This is the highest level ever seen in all of human history and is 144 percent higher than the pre-industrial average. Such a high level is also very likely the highest on record going back to between 800,000 and 15 million years ago, based on various studies.  For perspective, scientists have found that previous periods with similar carbon dioxide levels — all of which occurred before modern humans evolved — had far higher global average temperatures and sea levels than today. In some cases, such periods had global average sea levels of 100 feet higher than today. 800,000-year history of carbon dioxide levels in Earth's atmosphere, showing the recent spike. Image: Scripps institution of oceanography/mashable Many scientists think that avoiding dangerous climate change will require getting carbon dioxide concentrations down to 350 parts per million, which will require massive emissions cuts and new technologies to push annual emissions into negative numbers. While the planet was flirting with the 400 ppm mark on a month-to-month basis at some observatories, it had not yet breached the line worldwide for an entire year until 2015, the WMO found in a report released Monday.  The rate at which greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane are accumulating in the air guarantees that growing impacts from climate change, ranging from rising sea levels to hotter heat waves and ocean acidification, will continue to occur and in fact worsen in coming decades.  Carbon dioxide levels in 2016, with various emissions scenarios projected through 2100. Image: Climate Central This is in part because carbon dioxide can last in the air for thousands of years, which is why environmental advocates and policymakers say we only have one to two decades at most to act before an unsafe amount of climate change is essentially baked into the climate system.  The WMO report found there was a nearly 40 percent increase in the warming effect on our climate (technically known as "radiative forcing") between 1990 and 2015, due to the increase in greenhouse gases in the air. Scientists at the greenhouse gas monitoring station high atop Mauna Loa in Hawaii have said that carbon dioxide levels will not dip below 400 ppm for many generations, according to a WMO press release on Monday.  “The year 2015 ushered in a new era of optimism and climate action with the Paris climate change agreement. But it will also make history as marking a new era of climate change reality with record high greenhouse gas concentrations,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas in a statement.  In fact, last year saw the largest annual spike in greenhouse gas concentrations on record. Part of this sharp annual uptick is due to the strong 2015-16 El Niño event, which caused droughts in tropical areas that normally absorb carbon as so-called "sinks."  Drier than average weather in such areas, including Indonesia, reduced the ability of tropical forests to suck up as much carbon dioxide as they usually do, and increased the occurrence of forest fires that release carbon dioxide into the air.   “The El Niño event has disappeared,"  Taalas said. "Climate change has not."

    • US warns Philippines' Duterte over rhetoric, crime war

      Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte's fiery rhetoric and deadly crime war are becoming a growing concern around the world, the top US envoy for Asia warned on Monday in Manila. US assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Daniel Russel met the Philippines' defence and foreign ministers on Monday, after Duterte last week announced his nation's "separation" from the United States. "The succession of controversial statements, comments and a real climate of uncertainty about the Philippines' intentions have created consternation in a number of countries," Russel told reporters.

    • Turkey’s New Maps Are Reclaiming the Ottoman Empire

      Erdogan’s aggressive nationalism is now spilling over Turkey’s borders, grabbing land in Greece and Iraq.

      Foreign Policy Magazine
    • Big 12 hot seats topped by Charlie Strong at Texas

      KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Charlie Strong began his weekly news conference Monday by spending a couple of minutes discussing the multitude of self-inflicted wounds that cost Texas in its lost to Kansas State on Saturday.

      Associated Press
    • The Latest: Driver in fatal bus crash sued in other wrecks

      PALM SPRINGS, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on a tour bus crash that killed 13 people in Southern California (all times local):

      Associated Press
    • China admonishes the U.S. for visit to disputed India-China border

      China admonished the United States on Monday for sending its ambassador in India to a contested stretch of land on the India-China border, warning that a third party's meddling would only complicate the dispute between Beijing and New Delhi. China claims more than 90,000 sq km (35,000 sq miles) of territory disputed by India in the eastern sector of the Himalayas. Much of that forms the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, which China calls South Tibet.

    • Candidates focus on battleground states as Trump path to victory narrows

      A defiant Donald Trump blamed his campaign struggles on "phony polls" from the "disgusting" media on Monday, fighting to energize his most loyal supporters as his path to the presidency shrinks.

      WABC – NY
    • Bill Murray accepts humor prize after gentle roast

      In an evening filled with jokes about Bill Murray's elusiveness and quirky personality, it was David Letterman who provided the most touching moment as Murray was honored with the nation's top prize for ...

      Associated Press
    • Victim 'tortured for days' by British murder accused in Hong Kong

      A Hong Kong court Monday heard how British banker Rurik Jutting tortured one of his victims for three days as the trial opened into the killings of two Indonesian women at his upscale apartment. The court heard Jutting filmed both women on his iPhone and jurors were warned by judge Michael Stuart-Moore that the footage was "very shocking indeed". Sumarti Ningsih and Seneng Mujiasih, both in their 20s, were found dead in Jutting's flat in the early hours of November 1, 2014, after he called police.

    • Thirteen killed, 31 injured in California tour bus crash

      A tour bus crashed into the back of a tractor-trailer on a Southern California highway before dawn on Sunday, killing 13 people and injuring 31, authorities said. The bus was traveling west on Interstate 10 when the crash occurred near Palm Springs, a city about 100 miles (160 km) east of Los Angeles, California Highway Patrol (CHP) Chief Jim Abele told reporters. The bus driver was among the 13 killed, he said.

    • US: Philippines' Duterte sparking distress around the world

      MANILA, Philippines (AP) — A top American diplomat for Asia said Monday that Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte's controversial remarks and a "real climate of uncertainty" about his government's intentions have sparked distress in the U.S. and other countries.

      Associated Press
    • Israel's next Gaza war will be 'last' one: Lieberman

      Defence Minister Avigdor Lieberman said Monday that Israel's next war with Gaza militants would be their last "because we will completely destroy them," but added he remains committed to a two-state solution. Lieberman, speaking in an interview with Palestinian newspaper Al-Quds, said however that he did not want another war in Gaza, which would be the fourth since 2008. The outspoken former foreign minister urged Palestinians to pressure Hamas, the Islamist movement that runs the Gaza Strip, to "stop your crazy policies".

    • Video: Oregon Officials Launch Manhunt for Missing Woman Last Seen Hiking

      Annie Schmidt, daughter of a member of The Piano Guys, was hiking near Oregon's Columbia River Gorge.

      ABC News q
    • How one drug cartel banked its cash in New York City

      NEW YORK (AP) — In the photos, Alejandra Salgado and her little brother Francisco look like ordinary tourists strolling the streets of midtown Manhattan. He carries a shopping bag. She wears a white dress, a necklace and a leather tote slung over one shoulder.

      Associated Press
    • Powers discuss Mosul as Iraq forces inch towards outskirts

      Iraqi forces were inching to within striking distance of eastern Mosul Tuesday as defence chiefs from the US-led coalition met in Paris to review the offensive on the jihadist bastion. Paramilitary forces were also massing near the battlefield to open a western front they say will aim to retake the town of Tal Afar and cut off routes to neighbouring Syria for Islamic State fighters escaping Mosul. Forces from the elite counter-terrorism service (CTS) retook areas close to the eastern outskirts of Mosul, IS's last major urban stronghold in Iraq.

      AFP 57 min ago