Readers' Photos of the Solar Eclipse

Yahoo Contributor Network

Yahoo! News asked readers to snap photos of Sunday's eclipse. From China to the West Coast to the Great Plains, here's a sampling of their work. To add your own, along with a brief description, sign up with Yahoo! Contributor Network.

Related: Readers' favorite stargazing locations

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From A.K. Love in New Mexico: “When I took these photos on Sunday, I was roughly 6,212 feet above sea level, give or take, in the eastern mountains of New Mexico. This provided a great view of the solar eclipse that took place between 7 p.m. and 8:08 p.m. mountain time. I viewed them through the window of a welder's helmet and a JVC GZ-HD620 LCD screen, zoomed in at 30x optical zoom -- plus various digital zooms to bring an up close and rare complete view of the May 20 solar eclipse.”

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From Josienita Borlongan near San Francisco: “I used Canon PowerShot SX130 IS HD with 12X optical zoom with old xray film on top. A friend of mine took one of the photos from her backyard. She used a camera phone while her back was turned to prevent hurting her eyes. She viewed the eclipse from the viewer of her camera phone. Her photo shows as the moon covers the sun, before the ring of fire appeared.”

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From Todd Pheifer in Lakewood, Calif: “This picture was taken in the southern part of Los Angeles County. I am not an experienced photographer, but I wanted to capture the solar eclipse for posterity. I used my iPhone 4, and held a pair of eclipse sunglasses up the camera. The picture is not sharp, but it captures the fascinating effect.”

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From RJ Smith in Casa Grande, Ariz.: “I took these photos from the western side of Casa Grande near the western edge of town closer to the sunset. The eclipse was almost done around that time, but I think the pictures came out better during the sunset because the colors are more vivid than they would be had they been taken through a sun filter.”

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From Courtney Kunze in Kansas: “The solar eclipse on Sunday was partial one over the Midwest, but it still illuminated the sky with beautiful colors. I happened to catch the event by chance when I stopped to shoot a few sunset pictures for my photography portfolio. I found the best colors over the Konza Prairie Scenic Outlook on I-70 in the Flint Hills and was able to experience the event with other photographers and an ‘eclipse chaser.’ ”

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From Christine Fisher in Michigan: “Not long after the eclipse began, the sun moved behind some clouds and I was unable to watch or photograph the peak of the eclipse; however, I did see the beginning and it was very cool!”

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From Gioia Degenaars  in California: “It started uneventful enough. The sun slowly looking as though a small piece had been nibbled from its side. By the time we snapped the picture, the sun had now nearly been hidden. We couldn't help but think out loud that it felt a tad creepy to watch the blazing sun disappear in such a way. The picture shows the true blocking of the sun as it disappeared. Its faint glow and hue can be seen but the sky has begun to turn black -- a truly unusual version of night.”

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From Jean Kelly in Dallas: “Our view of the solar eclipse took place on the 32nd floor of Energy Plaza in downtown Dallas Sunday night. The images attached show a Western-facing perspective and occurred at 8:20 p.m., 8:21 p.m., and 8:22 p.m. -- in that order. In the third image, you can see Ernst & Young to the left, Fountain Place in the foreground, and Interstate 35E below. Despite the fact that the sun was not totally eclipsed by the moon, it was a beautiful sight nonetheless!”

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From Anthony Witherell in Zhengzhou, China: “The annular solar eclipse Sunday morning was a wonderful site to see. I brought both of my children out to see the eclipse and even made them a pinhole camera so they could view it safely. The pictures I took were taken a little after 6:30.”

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From Mary Esther Farnstrom in Yorba Linda, Calif: “I began taking pictures when the eclipse was closer to totality (which was around 6 p.m.) to show the amazing effect of the eclipse on the shadows that every tree projected on the walls around my home. If you can make out the crescent shape, you'll be able to see what was visible in literally every shadow around.”

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