Report: MSNBC Host Toure Founded a ‘Militant Anti-White Student Newspaper’

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Daily Caller: Toure Founded a Militant Anti White Student Newspaper at Emory University

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MSNBC host Touré, a writer and "cultural critic," has recently been in the news for attacking Dr. Benjamin Carson, the director of pediatric neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital.  Having insulted black Rush Limbaugh fans in the past, Touré said Dr. Carson's "un-serious" ideas are tolerated on the right only because he can be held up as a token black friend.

Now, a recent report by the Daily Caller suggests the television host has long seen the world through a racial lens.

"MSNBC host Touré founded a student newspaper dedicated to black liberation theology while he was a college student attending Emory University from 1989 to 1992," The Daily Caller claims. "Touré's flagship publication, The Fire This Time, lavished praise on famous anti-Semites, black supremacists, and conspiracy theorists whom Touré helped bring to campus.  Before he became an intense-but-sardonic TV personality, Touré also decried 'the suffocating white community' and defended a nationally famous fake hate crime."

According to the 4-page report, Touré helped coordinate speakers his paper described as "role models from the real world to speak about life."

The guests allegedly included Conrad Muhammad, the heir apparent at the time Louis Farrakhan with the virulently anti-white Nation of Islam (he has since defected), and H. Rap Brown, a.k.a. Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin, who was once on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List and was quoted as saying "If America don't come around, we're gonna burn it down."

He now refers to his guests, including Brown, as "some of the heroes of black nationalism of the 1960s," according to the Daily Caller.

Touré also argued as a student that even though black freshman Sabrina Collins faked the racist graffiti on her dorm at Emory University, that was besides the point.

Writing in The Fire This Time after Collins retracted her statement, Touré vented: "In the aftermath THE POSSIBILITY THAT COLLINS HERSELF PERPETRATED THE CRIME HAS SEEMED TO MINIMIZE THE INCIDENT'S IMPORTANCE. IN ANALYZING THE EVENT'S IMPORTANCE TO EMORY, IT IS NOT AT ALL IMPORTANT IF COLLINS DID IT."

According to the Daily Caller, Touré holds approximately the same view some twenty years later.  He told them in an interview: "Just because this particular incident didn't happen doesn't mean we don't get to talk about racism in Emory or in society. Or that we forget the tragic things that happen to black people. The point there was, she may have done this to herself, but this in no way suggests that racism does not exist."

He also defended his paper as "an important media voice in the ecology."

Click here to read the entire report by The Daily Caller.

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