Science

  • Virgin Galactic spaceship crashes during Calif. test flight

    A suborbital passenger spaceship being developed by Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic company crashed during a test flight on Friday at the Mojave Air and Space Port in California, killing one crew member and seriously injuring the other, officials said. The crash of the vehicle, undergoing its…

    Reuters27 mins ago
  • Researchers in Oregon identify autism-risk genes

    By Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND Ore. (Reuters) - Researchers in Oregon say they have identified 27 genes that may cause autism, according to a study published this week in the journal Nature. The research at Oregon Health and Science University has the potential to create a screening tool for parents…

    Reuters
  • GMO crops have fans, critics

    (Reuters) - Since commercialization of the world's first genetically engineered crops in 1995-1996, there has been an ongoing debate globally about the safety and effectiveness of the crops. China has recently slowed its process for allowing imports of certain types of GMO corn and rejected…

    Reuters
  • Rare Look Inside Tiny Mouth Wins 'Small World' Photo Contest

    In a photo contest that honors all things small, it's tough to beat a shot of a rotifer: A view into the mouth of one of the tiniest animals on the planet won the top prize in this year's Nikon Small World competition. Rotifers rank among tardigrades as the smallest creatures in the animal kingdom.…

    LiveScience.com
  • City: No active fault under Hollywood project site

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles building officials have signed off on geologist reports that found no active earthquake fault under the site of a proposed 16-story residential-office development in Hollywood.

    Associated Press
  • This Week in Science: A Rocket Catastrophe, Miniature Stomachs, and a Seriously Smelly Comet

    Seven days; lots of science in the news. Here's our roundup of this week's most notable and quotable items:The Antares rocket, built by private space outfit Orbital Sciences powered by refurbished Soviet engines from the 1960s, explosively failed to launch on its planned resupply mission to the…

    Huffington Post
  • 5 Spooky Space Views for Halloween

    Halloween on Earth usually brings out the ghouls and werewolves in neighborhoods around the United States, but what are some of the most unsettling sights in space? In honor of Halloween, here are five of Space.com's favorite creepy space images: The conjurer even has green skin, a crooked nose and…

    SPACE.com
  • Brraaiins! How Zombies Overran Pop Culture

    Unlike Dracula or Frankenstein, these Halloween monsters aren't based on a literary resource. In fact, the modern conception of a zombie dates back to 1968, in a movie that doesn't so much as use the word: George Romero's "Night of the Living Dead." "He didn't call them zombies, and he didn't think…

    LiveScience.com
  • Play

    NASA Just Finished Building Its Mars-Bound Orion Spacecraft

    NASA on Thursday announced the “finishing touches” to its new Orion spacecraft — the U.S.’s first manned platform since the retirement of the shuttle fleet in 2011, bringing the agency one step closer to its first Dec. 4 test flight, and humanity closer to its first step on Mars. Orion’s assembled…

    Wochit
  • Death or Full Recovery? Ebola Outcome May Depend on Your Genes

    People infected with Ebola vary greatly in how severe their symptoms are. Now, a new study in mice suggests that genetics plays a role in how each body reacts to the same Ebola virus. To study the relationship between genes and the virus, researchers used a group of mice that were bred to have high…

    LiveScience.com
  • FDA panel backs Daiichi's blood thinner

    By Natalie Grover (Reuters) - A panel of advisers to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration voted 9-1 in favor of approving Japanese drugmaker Daiichi Sankyo Co's blood thinner for use in some patients with atrial fibrillation. The drug, edoxaban, is a once-daily anticoagulant that inhibits Factor…

    Reuters
  • The No-Problem Problem

    Is Microsoft finally getting serious about making its workforce welcome to women and minorities? The internal memo that CEO Satya Nadella sent to his employees on October 15 is encouraging news. "I envision a company composed of more diverse talent," he said in his note, obtained by GeekWire. "I…

    Huffington Post
  • Ebola 'Patient Zero': How Outbreak Started from Single Child

    When Ebola virus came for the first time to a small village in Guinea, the victim was a toddler, who later became known to the world as Patient Zero. His name was Emile Ouamouno. "Emile liked to listen to the radio, and his sister liked to carry babies on her back," Emile’s father, Etienne…

    LiveScience.com
  • US Salamander Hotspot Could Fall to New Disease

    A newly described fungal disease is killing salamanders and newts in Europe and could soon land on U.S. The disease invades the skin of salamanders and newts, and is related to another fungus that has been wiping out frog and other amphibian populations around the world. "If it gets here, it's…

    LiveScience.com
  • Report: Dangerous lab fires show lack of training

    DENVER (AP) — Science teachers need more safety training before running dazzling chemical experiments that can result in dangerous flash fires, according to a recommendation Thursday from a federal board charged with investigating such accidents.

    Associated Press
  • View

    Top images from the 2014 Nikon Small World Competition (20 photos)

    Now celebrating its 40th year, Nikon Small World is widely regarded as the leading forum to recognize proficiency and photographic excellence of photography taken under the microscope. Small World is widely regarded as the leading forum for recognizing the art, proficiency and photographic…

    Yahoo News
  • Atlas Launches, Antares Explodes: Some Lessons For Washington

    It has been a week of ups and downs for America's space community -- literally.  On October 28, an Antares launch vehicle being used by Orbital Sciences Corporation to ferry supplies to the International Space Station failed shortly after liftoff in Virginia, falling back onto the launch pad in a…

    Forbes
  • New York unveils incentives for workers in West Africa Ebola fight

    By Ellen Wulfhorst NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York officials on Thursday announced a program to encourage healthcare professionals to work in Ebola-hit West Africa, an effort to deflect criticism that the state's mandatory quarantine could hamper the battle against the disease. The program will…

    Reuters
  • Book Talk: Black music, white culture and a legendary U.S. highway

    By Randall Mikkelsen BOSTON (Reuters) - Author Dennis McNally accompanied the Grateful Dead as a publicist and historian on the band's “long strange trip,” and he chronicled Jack Kerouac, the Beat Generation author of “On the Road.” For his latest book, “On Highway 61: Music, Race and the Evolution…

    Reuters
  • Play

    NASA Finishes Building Its Mars-bound Orion Spacecraft

    Humanity is one step closer to reaching Mars. NASA finished up its Orion Spacecraft Thursday, and its preparing for a test flight on Dec. 4. When Orion launches in December, aboard a Delta IV Heavy rocket, it will complete a 4.5-hour, two-orbit test flight. The flight will really put Orion to the…

    Wochit