Science

  • SpaceX's next launch delayed longer than expected

    SpaceX said its next launch will be delayed longer than expected after the June 28 accident that destroyed its unmanned ship carrying cargo to the International Space Station.

    Los Angeles Times
  • Air Force Official Predicts Private Launches for Military Satellites

    Budget pressures are pushing Pentagon planners to consider outsourcing satellite launches, routine military communication links and even some space-based surveillance operations to industry, a senior Air ...

    The Wall Street Journal
  • This new high tech network is recording climate data across Alaska

    Engineers are building a data and sensor network across remote and icy Alaska to record how the state is being transformed by climate change.

    Fortune
  • Precision Medicine Hits Reproductive Health

    Instead of lamenting the pace of precision medicine’s journeys, perhaps we had better figure out what to do once it arrives.

    Forbes
  • Play

    Scientists begin year-long isolation experiment

    Six scientists are locking themselves inside a small dome in Hawaii for a year to study the effects of long-term space travel. Sean Carberry reports.

    Reuters Videos
  • 'Awakenings' author, neurologist Oliver Sacks dies at 82

    NEW YORK (AP) — There was the blind man who had the disastrous experience of regaining his sight. The surgeon who developed a sudden passion for music after being struck by lightning. And most famously, the man who mistook his wife for a hat.

    Associated Press
  • Qatar coral reef at risk from warming seas: researchers

    High sea temperatures off the coast of Qatar threaten precious coral reef and have caused mass deaths among some 20 types of fish, Doha-based marine researchers said on Monday. A study carried out by experts from Qatar University, the environment ministry and the interior ministry last week has…

    AFP
  • Google, Sanofi team up to improve diabetes care

    (Reuters) - Google Inc and French drugmaker Sanofi SA said they will partner to develop tools to improve the management and treatment of diabetes. Sanofi will work with Google's life sciences team to collect, analyze and understand information impacting diabetes, which is expected to affect 592…

    Reuters
  • This 50-Cent Paper Microscope Could 'Democratize Science'

    A couple of months ago, I received an interesting package in the mail. It looked like a standard manila envelope, but inside was a device that could quite possibly revolutionize the way we view the microscopic world. I'm referring to the Foldscope, an origami-based optical microscope that is small…

    Huffington Post
  • SpaceX rocket grounded for 'couple more months,' company says

    By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla (Reuters) - SpaceX plans to keep its Falcon 9 rocket grounded longer than planned following a launch accident in June that destroyed a space station cargo ship, the company president said on Monday. The privately held company, owned and operated by technology…

    Reuters
  • Life Might Spread Across Universe Like an 'Epidemic' in New Math Theory

    As astronomers get closer to finding potential signatures of life on faraway planets, a new mathematical description shows how to understand life's spread — and to determine if it's jumping from star to star. "Life could spread from host star to host star in a pattern similar to the outbreak of an…

    SPACE.com
  • South Africa's Kruger Park still a magnet for rhino poachers

    By Ed Stoddard PRETORIA (Reuters) - The poaching of rhinos has risen in South Africa's Kruger National Park this year but is on the decline elsewhere in the country, Environment Minister Edna Molewa said on Sunday. The Kruger Park, South Africa's main tourist draw, is on the frontlines of a surge…

    Reuters
  • British scientists develop slow-melting ice cream

    The summer scourge of sticky hands could become a thing of the past as British researchers announced the discovery of an ingredient to make slow-melting ice cream on Monday. The protein BslA, which occurs naturally in some food, helps to blend the components of ice cream to make it smoother and…

    AFP Relax News
  • Ancient scorpion of the sea is the granddaddy of arachnids

    A newly described species of sea scorpion measures over 1.5 metres long and lived 460 million years ago.

    CNET
  • Earth's Moving Mantle Leads to Earthquakes in Unusual Places

    It has long been a mystery why some earthquakes strike towns in seemingly earthquake-proof regions, but researchers now have a potential explanation for why temblors sometimes rattle where they're not expected. Understanding the underlying source of these quakes could help officials prepare for…

    LiveScience.com
  • A Brief History of Levees

    The levee is a technology fundamental to human civilization.  Artificial embankments were designed for the earliest cities, along with the first known draining systems and wells. In the ruins of great Bronze Age civilizations, lost now for thousands of years, the imprints of advanced networks of…

    The Atlantic Wire (RSS)
  • Google wants to disrupt diabetes with new Sanofi partnership

    It’s official: Diabetes will be the first major focus of Google’s life sciences wing as it shifts into becoming its own subsidiary of parent company Alphabet. And its fast-growing team

    San Jose Mercury News
  • The second monkey in space looked profoundly uncomfortable

    If you know your space animals, then you're probably already familiar with Ham, the first chimp America ever launched into space. You also probably know Laika, the late, great Russian space dog and the first animal to orbit Earth.

    Vox.com
  • Serving Size Stumper: What's a Reasonable Amount to Eat?

    An update to the serving sizes listed on food labels will better reflect the amount of food people actually eat, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says. The serving sizes listed on foods are meant to reflect the amount that people typically consume in one sitting — but that doesn't mean that…

    LiveScience.com
  • This Redmond company just developed a highly efficient engine that could take us to deep space

    A pioneering Seattle-area outer space company has developed a new kind of deep space rocket engine that is 50 percent more fuel efficient than current designs. Aerojet Rocketdyne has for decades in Redmond built small rocket engines to guide satellites and deep space probes, but most of those have…

    American City Business Journals