Science

  • Business Insider
  • Lead in teeth holds secrets of person's origins, research shows

    By Barbara Liston ORLANDO Fla. (Reuters) - The lead in human teeth holds clues about where a person grew up and can help criminal investigators and archaeologists working with old or decomposed corpses, according to a University of Florida researcher. Because lead ore deposits around the world…

    Reuters
  • Book Talk: Paull's 'The Bees' looks at life inside the hive

    By Verity Watkins LONDON (Reuters) - Three years ago playwright Laline Paull began to notice bees in her garden in Sussex, southeast England. Her interest was inspired by the death of a beekeeping friend. “Angie had breast cancer, and she wasn’t going to make it. I was awed at her graciousness in…

    Reuters
  • Otzi 'The Iceman' Had Heart Disease Genes

    Ötzi the Iceman, a well-preserved mummy discovered in the Alps, may have had a genetic predisposition to heart disease, new research suggests. The new finding may explain why the man — who lived 5,300 years ago, stayed active and certainly didn't smoke or wolf down processed food in front of the TV…

    LiveScience.com
  • U.S. FDA panel reviews Baxter immune therapy's long-term safety

    By Toni Clarke Washington (Reuters) - Advisors to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will meet on Thursday to discuss the relative risks and benefits of Baxter International Inc's experimental treatment for certain hereditary disorders of the immune system. The FDA on Wednesday posted its…

    Reuters
  • Airbus, Safran name Alain Charmeau to run space joint venture

    Airbus Group and Safran on Wednesday named Alain Charmeau as the head of a new venture designed to reorganize Europe's space launch activities. The two companies said in June they had agreed to create a 50-50 joint venture in space launchers, combining Airbus's launch systems with Safran's…

    Reuters
  • Blood Test Predicts Suicide Risk, Study Suggests

    A new gene linked to suicide risk has been discovered, and researchers say the finding could lead to a blood test that predicts a person's risk of attempting suicide. The scientists found that a genetic mutation, in a gene called SKA2, was more common among the people who died by suicide. "We have…

    LiveScience.com
  • Air Pollution Isn’t Just Bad for Your Health—It’s Taking Food off Your Plate

    Scientists have long predicted climate change would begin to cripple global food production as rising temperatures damage crops. Now a first-of-its-kind study by MIT scientists shows that as the planet warms, ozone pollution will eat into the yields of four crops that provide more than half the…

    Takepart.com
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    Insect Farms: Investors See Big Profits in Thinking Small (10 photos)

    When it comes to resolving a big global food problem, a new breed of farmers and their financial backers are thinking small. Work on the world's largest fly farm has begun in South Africa after the European firm behind the project won much-needed funding from investors, propelling the use of…

    Reuters
  • Flight MH17 Victims Left Lasting Contributions to AIDS Advocacy

    These victims were on their way to the 20th International AIDS Conference, which took place last week in Melbourne, Australia, the International AIDS Society (IAS) has confirmed. Those lost include Dutch activists Lucie van Mens, who championed the female condom; Martine de Schutter, who worked on…

    LiveScience.com
  • Heat Waves & Cold Snaps Kill 2,000 Each Year in US

    About 2,000 Americans die each year due to extreme weather conditions, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    LiveScience.com
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    Drought increasing cases of avian botulism in Calif. birds

    Dead birds are turning up in Sacramento and there may be more in the Bay Area because of the drought.

    KGO – San Francisco
  • 23andMe lands $1.4 million grant from NIH to detect genetic roots for disease

    Home genetics startup 23andMe has secured a $1.4 million two-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to build survey tools and expand its gene database. With these funds from NIH, an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, the company intends to use its…

    Reuters
  • UPDATE 2-NCAA to settle head injury suit with $70 million fund

    (Corrects amount of NFL settlement) By Mary Wisniewski CHICAGO, July 29 (Reuters) - The NCAA has agreed to settle a head injury lawsuit by providing $70 million for concussion testing and diagnosis of current and former student athletes in a move expected to change the way such injuries are handled…

    Reuters
  • Women in STEM Begins With Girls in STEM: 7 Ways to Support a Generation of Scientific Young Women

    There is an issue with trying to determine why STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) is still a four-letter word to women: We're asking the wrong question. We should be asking instead, Why is STEM still a four-letter word to girls? Representing women in technology and science…

    Huffington Post
  • Nanosatellite Company Spire Raises $25M, Rocket Lab Unveils New Rocket

    Since 2008, investments in space-oriented companies have been few in number but steady

    The Wall Street Journal
  • Science of brain signals opens new era for advertising

    Companies in the near future will be able to test public reaction to advertisements, music and films before they are released by monitoring the brain signals of a select group as they watch a trial. So say psychologists who on Tuesday unveiled the results of an unusual set of experiments into…

    AFP Relax News
  • Quantum Wonderland: Neutron 'Cheshire Cats' Created

    The Cheshire Cat of the classic children's book "Alice in Wonderland" had a smile that could disconnect from its body. For instance, a particle can apparently exist in two or more places at once or spin two opposite directions at the same time, a property known as superposition. Theoretical…

    LiveScience.com
  • Americans Favor Low-Fat Diet Over Low-Carb

    However, the percentage of Americans who try to avoid fat has dropped slightly in recent years, by about 8 percentage points since 2004, according to Gallup. This trend may reflect recent research that has called into question the view that fat is the main culprit in weight gain, and instead points…

    LiveScience.com
  • Study: Infant rats can sense their mothers' fear using smell

    A new study at the University of Michigan Medical School found that infants may be able to detect their mothers' fear — through smell.

    The Week (RSS)