Science

  • Change in LGBT health sparked 50 years ago in Philadelphia

    By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - On July 4, 1965, with protest signs raised above their heads, 40 marchers outside Philadelphia's Independence Hall showed many people their first glimpse of lesbian, gay and bisexual Americans. The protesters and their leaders, Frank Kameny and Barbara…

    Reuters
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty: Technobabble's Role in the Arts (Op-Ed)

    Peter Clines has published short fiction and articles on the film and television industries and is author of the new novel "The Fold"(Crown Publishing, 2015). I'm not sure, but I think it was watching "The Amazing Colossal Man" on Creature Double Feature as a kid that gave me my first, foul-tasting…

    SPACE.com
  • Dazzling Interactive Video Shows What Humans Can't See From Earth

    If you think asteroids are rare, it's only because they're so small and dark and hard to see. An eye-opening new video (above) shows what the night sky would look like if we could see the near-Earth asteroids astronomers have discovered -- it's quite a swarm."We're essentially flying around the sun…

    Huffington Post
  • Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis promising for some patients

    LONDON (AP) — Doctors who gave children with cystic fibrosis a replacement copy of a defective gene say it appeared to slow the expected decline of some patients' lungs, but called the results "modest" and say there must be major improvements before offering the treatment more widely.

    Associated Press
  • Despite regulatory troubles, DNA testing firm 23andMe raises more money

    After FDA roadblocks, the company continues to push forward.

    Fortune
  • Russian cargo ship heads to space station, breaking string of failures

    A Russian Soyuz rocket blasted off on Friday to deliver a cargo ship loaded with food, water and equipment to the International Space Station, breaking a string of launch failures, a NASA TV broadcast showed. The Progress capsule, carrying more than three tons (2,700 kg) of supplies, was expected…

    Reuters
  • Play

    Paying With a Selfie

    MasterCard may let you use selfies as authentication.

    ABC News Videos
  • Solar-powered plane breaks solo flight record across Pacific to Hawaii

    By Suzanne Roig HONOLULU (Reuters) - A Swiss man attempting to circumnavigate the globe with an aircraft powered only by the sun's energy has broken a world record for the longest non-stop solo flight, the project team said on Thursday. The Solar Impulse, which took off from Japan on Monday on the…

    Reuters
  • First US Measles Death in 12 Years: How Was It Missed?

    A woman in Washington state is the first person to die of measles in the United States in a dozen years, authorities said today. The woman appears to have caught measles when she stayed at local medical facility. It's not clear exactly why doctors failed to catch her measles diagnosis until after…

    LiveScience.com
  • Russian Cargo Spacecraft Launches Toward Space Station

    It looks like a robotic cargo ship will actually make it to the International Space Station this time.

    SPACE.com
  • Aliens will look just like humans, says Cambridge professor

    Technically Incorrect: Building on the principle of evolutionary convergence, an academic says it's likely that aliens will resemble us.

    CNET
  • Thailand's first MERS case to leave hospital

    An Omani man who became Thailand's first case of Middle East Respiratory Sydnrome (MERS) has made a full recovery and will be discharged from hospital on Friday, Thailand's health minister said. The 75-year-old man, who had traveled to Bangkok for treatment for a heart condition and was then…

    Reuters
  • Could searchers' sonars have missed wreckage of Flight 370?

    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Amid rising frustrations over the expensive, so-far fruitless search for vanished Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, experts are questioning the competence of the company in charge, including whether crews may have passed over the sunken wreckage without even noticing.

    Associated Press
  • How to Keep People From Bugging Out About Eating Insects

    Years ago in a South American rainforest, the researcher I was visiting announced with something like joy that he had just found some palm beetle grubs. They were fat, yellow, and the length of my fingers, and when we sautéed them with garlic in a frying pan, the skins took on a lovely al dente…

    Takepart.com
  • How Math Can Defeat Bullies

    Do kids have an unheralded incentive to master math? This week, I’m sharing responses to the question, “What insight or idea has thrilled or excited you?” This installment comes courtesy of John Allen Paulos, a Professor of Mathematics at Temple University who is here this week at The Aspen Ideas…

    The Atlantic
  • The chemistry behind a firework explosion

    It’s Independence Day, and that means it’s time for controlled explosions in the sky. No, not Texas post-rock — the great scientific display that is a fireworks show. "Fireworks are an application of chemistry and engineering: you need good chemistry to get the effects up in the sky and good…

    The Verge
  • Colorful Arctic Animals Revealed in Thousands of Undersea Images

    New photographs of fluorescent sea creatures — including bright orange animals that resemble feather dusters with long, skinny handles, and spongy, neon-pink anemones — on the Arctic seafloor could help researchers determine how much methane, a potent greenhouse gas, will make its way to the…

    LiveScience.com
  • Suspected Congo Ebola victims test negative for the virus

    Six hunters in the Democratic Republic of Congo who fell sick and were suspected to have Ebola have tested negative for the virus, the health minister said on Saturday. The government and World Health Organization investigated a possible outbreak about 270 km (170 miles) northeast of the capital…

    Reuters56 mins ago
  • NASA Slammed a Probe Into a Comet 10 Years Ago Today

    When you're watching the fireworks displays this Fourth of July, take a moment to reflect on some cosmic pyrotechnics that NASA pulled off a decade ago. On July 4, 2005, while zooming along millions of miles from Earth, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft released an 820-lb. (370 kilograms) probe that…

    SPACE.com