Science

  • ISS Astronauts Baffled By Strange 'Spikes' Spotted In Siberia

    Astronauts looking down on Earth from the International Space Station in June were left scratching their heads when they spotted a “strange pattern of spikes" crossing Siberia's Kulunda Steppe. The astronauts were so puzzled that they called down to Houston to ask for an explanation, according to…

    Huffington Post
  • 5 Apps For A Perfect Labor Day Weekend

    Whether your plans take you on the road, to a beach or just hanging out at home, check out these five apps that will help you make the most of the extended weekend.

    ABC News
  • NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Marie from Space (Photo)

    A NASA satellite has captured the once-mighty Hurricane Marie losing steam over the cool waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean. NASA's GOES-West satellite snapped a photo of Marie at 11:00 a.m. EDT (1500 GMT) Thursday (Aug. 28), the same day the maelstrom was downgraded from a hurricane to a tropical…

    SPACE.com
  • New test may predict worker hearing loss

    By Madeline Kennedy NEW YORK (Reuters) - Not everyone exposed to high noise levels at work experiences hearing loss as a result, and a new study suggests a simple test can predict which workers will be affected. Researchers caution that low accuracy in predicting who would not suffer hearing loss…

    Reuters
  • Germany's Bayer to launch three new Xarelto trials

    Germany's Bayer unveiled plans to launch three new studies to expand the uses of its anti-clotting drug Xarelto, one of its top five new medicines. Xarelto, which competes with the Eliquis pill developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer in stroke prevention, reached sales of $1.7 billion in the…

    Reuters
  • Google Lunar XPrize: Part-Time Scientists visit the moon in Germany

    Eighteen teams are in a race to get to the moon, with a $30 million payoff. Team Part-Time Scientists recently explored a simulated lunar surface in Bremen, Germany.

    CNET
  • Are You Driving Your Data? Or Is Your Data Driving You?

    In business, politics and philanthropy, being data-driven has become a point of pride.Leaders parade decision-making as rational and strategic because they "have the numbers" to support it. The tech revolution with its miraculous information-processing seems to support the idea of data as king.But…

    Huffington Post
  • 'Jeopardy!'-Winning Computer Now Crunching Data for Science

    Watch out, Sherlock, there's a new Dr. Watson in town. IBM's Watson, the computer that famously won the quiz show 'Jeopardy!', is now helping researchers make scientific discoveries. The new system, known as the Watson Discovery Advisor, could accelerate the scientific process by sifting through…

    LiveScience.com
  • Volcanic eruption in Papua New Guinea causes flight diversions

    SYDNEY (Reuters) - A volcanic eruption in Papua New Guinea on Friday sent smoke and ash spewing high over the South Pacific island nation, leading some aircraft to alter their flight paths. Mount Tavurvur on East New Britain Island erupted hours before dawn, a bulletin from the Rabaul…

    Reuters
  • Defending Against Hackers of the Future

    Cryptographers are working on ways to thwart quantum computers

    BusinessWeek
  • Questions for IBM’s Watson

    IBM’s Watson keeps adding new features. But can it make money?

    The New York Times
  • Two-Thirds of US Teens with Mental Health Problems Get Counseling

    These services include any treatment or counseling provided in the school, childcare center, clinic, home or other places. Such treatment also includes attending a school or special school program for students with emotional or behavioral difficulties.  About 4 percent of all adolescents ages 12 to…

    LiveScience.com
  • Scientists Experiment With Reworking Memory in Mice

    In experiments on mice, scientists rewired the circuits of the brain and changed the animals' bad memories into good ones.

    The Wall Street Journal
  • How Delivery Drones Could Monitor Their Own Health

    The day when people can order products online and have them delivered by a drone may not be far off. "With something like package delivery, which needs to be done [consistently] over hours, you need to take into account the health of the system," Ali-akbar Agha-mohammadi, an aeronautical engineer…

    LiveScience.com
  • Warming aids Arctic economies but far short of 'cold rush'

    By Alister Doyle OSLO, (Reuters) - Climate change is aiding shipping, fisheries and tourism in the Arctic but the economic gains fall short of a "cold rush" for an icy region where temperatures are rising twice as fast as the world average. A first cruise ship will travel the icy Northwest Passage…

    Reuters
  • Scientists solve mystery of moving Death Valley rocks

    By Alex Dobuzinskis LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A solution to the longstanding mystery of why rocks move erratically across an isolated patch of California's Death Valley finally emerged on Thursday, when researchers published a study showing the driving force was sheets of wind-driven ice. Trails from…

    Reuters
  • Environmentalists Petition to Put the Monarch Butterfly on the Endangered Species List as Its Population Plummets

    The spectacle of monarch butterflies working their way back to their winter breeding grounds, across hundreds or thousands of miles, is the longest known insect migration on Earth.   It’s such a popular event, and the monarchs are so beautiful—their brilliant orange wings bordered with a…

    Takepart.com
  • There's No Quick Path to the Internet of Things

    We need to create a faster development path for the Internet of Things, or we will probably forget about the IoT before we see many benefits from it, Guest Columnist Thomas H. Davenport warns.

    The Wall Street Journal