The Social Network Most Recruiters Use

If you are looking for a job and aren't on LinkedIn, you may want to hurry up and join: 97 percent of recruiters are using the self-proclaimed "world's largest professional network" as a place to find new employees, a new study has found.

Other social networks were much less popular among recruiters, the research by Bullhorn Reach found. Twitter, the second most popular network for recruiters, was used by just 27 percent of recruiters. An even smaller percentage — 22 percent — of recruiters turned to Facebook as a source for recruiting.

For the most part, recruiters aren't focusing their recruiting efforts on more than one social network. Just 12 percent of recruiters said they utilize all three major social networks — Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. However, 14 percent of respondents said they use a combination of LinkedIn and Twitter, compared to just 8 percent who said they use LinkedIn and Facebook.    

[Social Recruiting Becomes the Norm]

Though most recruiters do not use a combination of social networks when it comes to looking for workers, there were a few exceptions based on industries. Recruiters looking for information-technology workers were the most likely to utilize all three networks. Additionally, recruiters in finance and banking, health care and manufacturing said they are more likely to check all three social networks when trying to fill a position.  

The biggest reason for LinkedIn's prominence among recruiters is its popularity with job seekers. LinkedIn drove a significantly higher number of views for job postings than either of the other social networks.

"Social recruiting continues to gain momentum, and it’s no surprise that LinkedIn remains the preferred network for recruiters, given its early and fervent adoption," said Art Papas, president and CEO of Bullhorn, which conducted the research. "Social media helps recruiters reach a much larger pool of talent than they would through traditional means. In 2012, when we issued our first social recruiting activity report, it was mainly tech-savvy early adopters using Bullhorn Reach. Now it’s mainstream."

The research was based on the responses of more than 160,000 recruiters within the Bullhorn Reach user network.

This story was provided by BusinessNewsDaily, a sister site to LiveScience. Follow David Mielach on Twitter @D_M89 . Follow us @bndarticlesFacebook or Google+. Originally published on BusinessNewsDaily.

Copyright 2013 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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