Sony's New Action Cam Wants to Go Skiing, Skydiving With You

Mashable
Sony's New Action Cam Wants to Go Skiing, Skydiving With You
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Sony Action Cam in Snow

Sony Action Cam in Snow

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[More from Mashable: Sony Xperia Tablet S Wants to Be Best Friends With Your TV]

Sony wants to capture every second of your next big sky-diving, mountain climbing or surfing adventure. The company unveiled on Wednesday during the 2012 IFA conference in Berlin a rugged new action video camera that can be tacked on to anything from a helmet to a surf board.

The lightweight, ultra-compact HDR-AS15 Action Cam shoots HD video in almost any condition -- rain, snow and even at depths down 60 meters. It's also waterproof and measures in at just 2 inches high by 2.6 inches deep.

[More from Mashable: Nokia, Sony and Samsung Team Up to Improve Indoor Navigation]

The device provides an ultra-wide 170-degree angle of view, along with five video record modes, from full HD to VGA for extra-long shooting times. Meanwhile, two special slow-motion modes make it easier for users to, say, analyze a golf swing or watch a BMX stunt in detail. It can also do time-lapse photography.

SEE ALSO: Sony to Debut Big-Screen 4K TV by End of 2012

Although the device doesn't come with built-in storage, it does support microSD and Memory Stick Micro cards, as well as a Micro-HDMI output so you can stream videos to a larger screen.

The Action Cam will hit the U.S. in September and will cost $200. A Wi-Fi version of the device, which allows you to send videos directly to your iOS or Android smartphone or tablet, is also available for $270. Both models will debut in European markets in October.

This story originally published on Mashable here.

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