Support continues to grow for #BringBackOurGirls campaign

Movement to find kidnapped girls stages protest in Los Angeles

Yahoo News

The movement to raise awareness and ultimately secure the return of hundreds of kidnapped Nigerian girls continues to gain momentum both online and off, thanks to the efforts of celebrities and political leaders alike. 

Anne Hathaway attended a protest in Los Angeles. She and her husband, Adam Shulman, reportedly surprised the protestors, showing up and leading the crowd in chants.

Filmmaker Ramaa Mosley was also in attendance. She told Entertainment Tonight that Hathaway's "voice was louder than everybody else. They were yelling at all the cars (passing by)!"

Speaking to Yahoo's own Katie Couric, Mosley, who helped popularize the #bringbackourgirls hashtag, said she first heard about the mass kidnappings on April 23 on the radio. "I was heartbroken, I was sickened. I couldn't believe this could happen in 2014."

Mosley continued, "I am completely inspired and have so much respect for the Nigerian people. … They raised their voices up that we could hear it. I am so honored that I could help in the ways I have been able to.”

When asked how regular folks can support the cause, Mosley encouraged people to "write our government, (Secretary of State) John Kerry, and the White House to tell them that we care."

First lady Michelle Obama recently posted a photo to Twitter using the hashtag  #bringbackourgirls.

Celebrated author and activist Malala Yousafzai also posted a much-viewed photo and wrote an editorial for Time magazine imploring people around the world to take a stand against the actions of the Nigerian group Boko Haram, purported to have orchestrated the mass kidnapping.

Malala writes, "These are innocent young schoolgirls with their whole lives ahead of them. They have families who are going through unimaginable pain. Their only crime was no different than my own: all they wanted was to get an education."

 Angelina Jolie spoke openly about the #bringbackourgirls campaign while promoting her upcoming film "Maleficent."

"This epidemic of men thinking women do not have the right to have an education and that they feel that they can get away with this kind of behavior and that its fine to just take a woman to sell a woman, to abuse a woman, to rape a woman. We have to end this culture of impunity," Jolie said.

Other celebrities to post messages of support for the kidnapped girls include Amy Poehler and Alicia Keys.

While many of the most outspoken supporters of the #bringbackourgirls movement are women, men are also lending their voices in support. NBA All-Star Pau Gasol posted a photo and wrote, "These situations can’t be tolerated. Help spreading the message."

 Follow Mike Krumboltz on Twitter (@mikekrumboltz).

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