These goats were set loose in the Congressional Cemetery

Chris Moody, Yahoo News
Yahoo News
This is the Congressional Cemetery in southeast Washington, D.C.

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About 200 former members of Congress and their family members are memorialized here.

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Lots of famous people are buried here, too, such as J. Edgar Hoover, the first director of the FBI.


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And Mary Ann Hall, the madam of D.C. who ran a bordello for Civil War soldiers.

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A few months ago, it was discovered that the cemetery had some extra property. But the property is covered with thick poisonous plants that can suffocate the trees. Boo!

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Clearing the land with machinery and pesticides would have cost more than $10,000 and harmed the environment. So the cemetery settled on something better: Goats!


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Goats can eat poisonous plants and can clear an entire acre in only a few days. The cemetery ordered about 60 to eat for a full week.

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A company called Eco-Goats brought the goats from Maryland.

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Signs directed tourists to see the goats at the Congressional Cemetery.



A giant truck arrived Wednesday with a haul of goats. Yahoo News hopped on for the ride.

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The truck backed into the cemetery, and off the goats went!

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The goats began eating everything in sight.

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Extra points for this guy.

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Wait, you can't seriously be taking a break already. Your only job is to eat. Your. Only. Job.

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Goats are pretty much gluttons. "It just amazes me, the sheer volume of vegetation that can go through a goat in a short amount of time," said Brian Knox, who raises the animals. "You're looking at 10 to 15 pounds per animal, per day."

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After a week, the goats will clear 1.6 acres of land at a cost of only 25 cents per goat per hour.

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Pretty sweet deal, huh?

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