Exercise and Fitness

Out of shape in middle age may mean a smaller brain later

Reuters By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - People who are out of shape in midlife may end up with smaller brain volume as they age compared to peers who exercise regularly, a according to a U.S. study. While past research suggests that brain shrinkage may be an unavoidable part of aging, the new findings add inactivity to a growing list of factors like smoking, obesity, diabetes and high blood …

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